Recipes

any-kind-of-fruit galette

The days are getting longer, fruit that has recently emerged from the earth, rather than cellophane, is showing up at markets and in CSAs, and you know what this means, right? It’s time to resist the siren call of pie season and make a galette instead. Galettes are the very best way to bring pie into your everyday life — and yes, I believe your everyday life deserves baked fruit in a buttery, flaky shell — because everything about them is easier. A single crust requires less time and less work. Because it doesn’t have the responsibility of keeping pounds of fruit from soaking into a pie plate, a more tender and flaky dough can be used. The filling uses less fruit and requires less of a shopping commitment. There’s less flavor-occluding sugar and thickeners because galettes are more forgiving of messiness. You don’t need a particular pan or even shape; oblong blobs taste as good and work exactly as well as circles.


butter into flour and saltfingers or pastry blenderadd sour cream and waterbring into a packet

There have been twelve galette recipes on this site since I established my membership on Team Galette a mind-boggling 14 years ago, but they all suffer from what I call a specificity problem. This one has a cool shape and ricotta. This one has amaretti crumbs. This one is thicker and barely sweetened. This one is part cheesecake. But when, I have some strawberries, a few stalks of rhubarb, and half a lemon in my fridge and I don’t want to think too hard about things? This is the one I make.

what I usedwith sugar, thickener, lemon juiceready to rollrolledfilledbrushed and sugared, ready to bake

The crust is exceptionally light and you’re unlikely find an easier one to roll out. Beginners excel at this dough. The bottom is never soggy. The fruit isn’t too sweet. The amount of time you need to plan ahead is negligible because a funny thing I’ve learned in the last 65 days is that even with all of the time in the world, I’m extremely disinterested in planning ahead. Is it so terrible that I want my pies to have the luxury of impulsivity, too? This galette says no.

any-fruit-you-like galette

Previously

Six months ago: Dry-Brined Turkey with Roasted Onions
One year ago: Potato Vareniki
Two years ago: Ruffled Milk Pie
Three years ago: Tall Fluffy Buttermilk Pancakes and Potatoes Anna
Four years ago: Failproof Crepes + A Crepe Party, Crispy Tortellini with Peas and Proscuitto, Confetti Cookies and Roasted Carrots with Avocado and Yogurt
Five years ago: Not Derby Pie Bars, Liege Waffles and Mushrooms and Greens with Toast
Six years ago: Strawberry Rhubarb Crisp Bars and Soft Pretzel Buns and Knots
Seven years ago: Japanese Cabbage and Vegetable Pancakes
Eight years ago: Warm, Crisp and a Little Melty Salad Croutons and Chocolate Buckwheat Cake
Nine years ago: Creme Brulee French Toasts, Leek Toasts with Blue Cheese, Vermontucky Lemonade, and Easy Jam Tart
Ten years ago: Endive and Celery Salad with Fennel Vinaigrette, Rhubarb Cobbler, and Broccol Slaw
Eleven years ago: Brownie Roll-Out Cookies, Green Bean and Cherry Tomato Salad
Twelve years ago: Martha’s Macaroni-and-Cheese and Crispy Salted Oatmeal White Chocolate Cookies and Cherry Cornmeal Upside-Down Cake
Thirteen years ago: Raspberry-Topped Lemon Muffins

Any-Kind-Of-Fruit Galette

  • Servings: 8
  • Source: Smitten Kitchen
  • Print

    Crust
  • 1 1/4 cups (165 grams) all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon fine sea or table salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons (6 grams) granulated sugar
  • 8 tablespoons (4 ounces or 115 grams) cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 1/4 cup (60 grams) plain yogurt or sour cream
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons (45 to 60 ml) cold water
  • Filling
  • 3 1/2 cups berries, stone fruit, or other fruit, chopped or thinly sliced, or any combination thereof
  • Pinch of salt
  • Juice of half a lemon or lime (optional)
  • 1/4 cup (50 grams) granulated sugar
  • 1/2 to 1 1/2 tablespoons tapioca flour/starch (see Note, below)
  • To finish
  • 1 egg beaten with 1 teaspoon water (optional)
  • Turbinado or coarse sugar for sprinkling
  • Softly whipped cream or vanilla ice cream, to serve

Make the pastry: Combine the flour, sugar, and salt in a large bowl. Sprinkle butter over dough and using a pastry blender or your fingertips, work it into the flour until the mixture resembles small peas. Sprinkle sour cream and 3 tablespoons water over mixture and stir/mash it together to combine; it should form large clumps; add last tablespoon water if it does not. Use your hands to bring it together into a single mass. Transfer dough to a large square of parchment paper, patting it into a flatter packet, and wrap it tightly. Chilling it in the fridge until firm, 1 to 2 hours or up to 4 days. You can hasten the firming process along in the freezer, for about 20 minutes.

Make filling: Combine fruit, salt, citrus juice (if using), sugar, and starch in a medium bowl and set aside.

Assemble galette: Heat oven to 400°F and flatten the parchment paper that you wrapped your dough in on a large baking sheet. On a floured counter, roll the dough out into a large round-ish shape, about 14 inches across. Gently transfer it to the parchment paper in the pan. Spoon fruit filling and any juices that have collected into center, leaving a 2- to 3-inch border uncovered. Fold this border over fruit, pleating the edge to make it fit. The center will be open.

For a darker, glossier crust, beat egg with 1 teaspoon of water and brush it over the crust. Sprinkle it all over with turbinado or coarse sugar.

Bake galette: For 30 to 35 minutes, or golden all over and the fruit is bubbling and juicy. Cool for at least 20 minutes on wire rack. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Do ahead: Fruit galettes keep at room temperature for a few days and up to a week in the fridge.

Note: This recipe is abundantly flexible.
* Fruit: Use whatever fruit you like to bake with (shown here with about 2 cups sliced rhubarb and 1 1/2 cups sliced strawberries).
* Flavors: Use another kind of citrus or none at all; you could add zest or vanilla to the crust. You could slick the bottom of the crust with jam or marzipan.
* Flour: Replace 1/2 cup of the all-purpose flour with whole wheat or rye flour.
* Sweetness: The filling is lightly sweetened; you can add up to 3 more tablespoons sugar without putting it over-the-top. For an even less-sweet galette, you could replace the sugar on the crust with poppy or sesame seeds.
* Thickeners: Tapioca flour or starch is my favorite for a clear, unchalky set. If you don’t have it, use an equal amount of cornstarch. Different kinds of fruit have different pectin levels, and might need more or less thickener. For apples or blueberries, use 1/2 tablespoon level. For peaches or fresh cherries, use 1 tablespoon. For strawberries, blackberries, raspberries, and rhubarb, use 1 1/2 tablespoons.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

New here? You might want to check out the comment guidelines before chiming in.

124 comments on any-kind-of-fruit galette

    1. Colleen

      I used frozen rhubarb, and it turned out fine. I did drain it first though. Maybe add a little extra thickener for frozen berries.

    1. Esvee

      I made this with just rhubarb, using the recommended 1/4 cup of sugar. For me it was perfect, which is not very sweet. And it wasn’t sour at all, which I was concerned about.

  1. Julie

    Perfect timing Deb, I was planning on doing a galette this weekend with the 3 apples, 2 pears, and 1 plum I have lingering.

  2. Hi,
    This looks so good and is just what I was looking for. I just started a strawberry garden with my kids and the strawberries are starting to come out so they have been wanting to look for recipes to make with them. We came across this recipe and can’t wait to try it. I love how it can be used with any fruit too. This may become our new go to recipe for left over fruits we may have. The dough seems easy enough too for the kids to help out with making and forming. Thank you so much for sharing!
    Heather

  3. Carly

    Looks delicious! I’m low on unsalted butter lately and can’t find it in the store. Could coconut oil work as a sub?

    1. deb

      I think it will work a little differently because it’s not as firm when it is cold. I would ease off on the water unless the dough seems to need it to come together.

  4. Stephanie

    We never have any sour cream in the house, and the only yogurt we have is fruit-flavored for our toddler. Is there something else we could use in the crust instead? Could we make it just like a sweet pie crust?

    1. Helen

      Could you also do a “buttermilk” substitute – milk with a tablespoon of vinegar per cup? I do a shortcrust that uses vinegar all the time. You do not taste it and I think it is supposed to activate either the baking soda or baking powder…

  5. Anna

    Yum! Do you think the crust would hold up to dairy-free swap outs for the butter and yogurt? Thinking an oil-based margarine and an almond- or coconut-based yogurt. Thanks Deb!

      1. Grace

        This was delicious and so simple to put together! Also a great way to use up blueberries and strawberries we had on hand. Family couldn’t get enough!

    1. Claire

      Because I was both desperate to make this and too lazy to go to the store, I tried canned coconut milk instead of yogurt or sour cream and it worked perfectly. I used the same 1/4 cup measurement and the dough still needed about 3 tablespoons of water. (I did use regular butter though.)

  6. Arianne

    I just made this and it is delicious. We’re from the Netherlands, and here, strawberries are now completely in season. Thanks for the recipe, will make it again!

    1. Natalie

      Yes! I use my food processor for galette and pie dough all the time. Use the fp to cut the butter into the dry ingredients, then dump everything into a bowl, add the wet ingredients, and stir. For me, it works every time!

  7. Lovely! I deeply appreciate flexible recipes like this, especially ones that are like PIE which is my favorite.
    (I also do not seem to have the time to do all the projects and planning that some people are doing – covidbrain, perhaps? No guilt, though!)

    1. Kristen

      @Liz I use Greek yogurt in Deb’s galette recipes every time–works great! I measure by weight, but I’m sure using volume would be fine, too.

  8. I will go to my grave reciting Jacques Pepin’s galette recipe. Done in the food processor in 20 seconds, it’s endlessly adaptable and I use it for sweet and savory. Last spring, when neighbors were begging people to take rhubarb off their hands, I nailed down a macerated rhubarb galette that started with almond cream. Sublime. All hail the galette!

    1. Linda

      Could cream of tarter be substituted for tapioca or cornstarch? Same quanity as these?

      I usually have vanilla yogurt on hand so suppose i could use that instead of plain yogurt?

      Can’t wait to try this recipe.

      1. Jen

        Hi Linda, cream of tartar is an acid in dried form (tartaric acid, specifically). It’s not a starch and doesn’t function like them, meaning it won’t provide the thickening action required here. If you don’t have tapioca or corn starch, you can use regular flour although it won’t work quite as well as it’s less absorbent.

  9. Kate

    Is there a reason not to roll the dough out on the parchment directly? Then just transfer paper+crust onto baking sheet?

      1. Mindi

        I rolled mine out and after I piled on the fruit and folded, it leaked. How do you not get strawberry juice everywhere? Mine looks like it was murdered. I’m still going to eat it though!

      2. Tammy Vela

        Made this today and OHHHHHHH MY GOODNESS!!!!!!!! I want to make this 18 times a day we loved it so much!!!! Thank you so much for all your recipes!!

    1. CarolJ

      I’m chiming in with another appeal for advice on any adjustments for an all-rhubarb version. I prefer my rhubarb “straight up”:)

  10. Meredith

    I’ve made both your nectarine galette and the blue and red berry galette in the past few weeks! It’s strawberry season here, and a galette is perfect, since I have a dough phobia. I’ve found both recipes to be easy-to-follow and delicious. This post will be my go-to reference from now on – thanks for the notes!

    1. Natalie Todd

      Yes! I’ve made Deb’s various galette recipes many times swapping gf all-purpose flour by weight. It turns out wonderfully! No other adjustments needed.

      I use the ATK all-purpose blend and add 3/4 tsp xanthan gum.

  11. Annie

    I love galettes! I love that you can make them any size you want. Question: any particular reason for using yogurt in a galette crust? (I’ve always just used a regular all-butter crust but hoping to learn something new!)

  12. Olga

    This was super delicious. I used strawberries and apricots and oh – the pastry is the star, but fruit and sauce are amazing! Simple whipped cream is perfect with this. Wish we could post pictures. It looks fab.

  13. Any reason to use the crust recipe without the sugar for a savory galette, or does the sugar contribute to the texture somehow? I have this hazy fantasy of throwing whatever I get from my CSA into a galette with some cheese.

  14. Nicole Gordon

    Just made these and they came out perfect! So flaky and delicious. I made them miniature, and they work like that as well! Rolled out circles of about 6cm in diameter. Thanks for another amazing recipe :)

  15. Bekki

    I put this together today, it turned out wonderfully and pie crust is usually not my best work!

    We used 3 small, very ripe peaches and about 1.5 cups of blueberries. I used 3/8 cup of sugar and a tablespoon of cornstarch. It held together and released almost no juice, so I think that was about right.

    Considering the whole thing took about 20 minutes of active time (spread over a couple of hours), I think it will go in regular rotation. Thanks for the perfect recipe!

  16. Linda

    Oops, I meant Arrowroot as a substitute for tapioca or cornstarch. Is I could substitute Arrowroot, what would the quantities convert to?

    Thx so much as I think this galette will be a real keeper!!🤗🤗🤗

  17. Melody

    Is it paramount to chill the dough? I find it hard to roll it out once out of the fridge. Could another option be to roll it out and then put it in the fridge? Thanks!

    1. deb

      It’s okay if it’s firm, it will soften up as you roll it. This dough should be rolled out cold. The butter pieces will be too warm and make the dough seem greasy before it’s had time to chill.

  18. Kathryn McCauley

    Since rhubarb is so tart did you do anything to it or does the sweetness from the berries plus the 1/4c of sugar take care of that? We don’t care for too sweet so this sounds awesome. Thx
    P.s. love getting your emails, always something different

  19. Mandy S.

    I made this last night! So excited to have made a Smitten Kitchen recipe the day it was released. And it was my first ever galette. I used strawberries & a lime (these fruits all needed to be used ASAP), and I had exactly enough sour cream (maybe a tiny bit under 1/4 cup) for the crust. I used the egg wash and it looks very pretty. I thought it wasn’t quite sweet enough, but my husband had it for breakfast and said it was perfect. (I admit I did sprinkle a little sugar on my second helping.) I also didn’t feel like whipping cream, so I poured a bit on top, and it was delicious. I’ll definitely make this again with different fruits. Thanks for another great recipe!

  20. Luise

    Made this the day the recipe was published and oh my this is brilliant! Super easy, fast and utterly fresh and delicious. Even the boyfriend who is super nonplussed when it comes to desserts loved this and demanded seconds.

  21. bookishbiker

    “But when, I have some strawberries, a few stalks of rhubarb, and half a lemon in my fridge…” I feel seen. This is literally what’s going on in there. Thanks for this great suggestion!

  22. Georgette Hasiotis

    Deb – as a longtime fan and regular user of your recipes I not only admire the substance of what you do in terms of ensuring each recipe is trimmed of any unnecessary steps and results in success, I also adore the way your website randomly selects recipes from the archive. A thought occurred to me and I wonder if you can help: Is there any way regular users might be able to keep track of recipes we have made from SK and keep our own notes? Thanks for all you do and Happy Memorial Day! Georgette

  23. Hmmm, I just discovered your blog the other day searching for new inspiration vegetarian recipes. Now you’ve got me wanting to try this dessert, too! Maybe Ill give this a go with peaches, since I’m seeing them in the stores lately. Let me know if you have another fruit / flavor suggestion that goes well with peaches! :)

  24. Jessie Duan

    This looks amazing!!! We like things very un-sweetened in our house. If I leave out the sugar in the filling, should I add more cornstarch to keep it from getting too watery?

  25. Gaby

    Careful with the water. I used 3 tablespoons and my dough was so wet. I redid it and my dough only needed 2. So I would just add one tablespoon at a time

    1. Marny

      My dough was incredibly sticky after I added the 3 tbs of water and I had to add more flour to make it useable. And after letting it chill, wouldn’t it make more sense to roll it out directly on the parchment paper instead of trying to transfer the thin dough from the counter to the parchment? Then you can just move the parchment paper to the pan. I rolled it out on my floured counter and it fell to pieces when I tried to transfer it, so I had to start the chilling process all over again. Hopefully, it will still turn out on attempt #2 without me having to rebuild from scratch.

  26. Sallie in Boston

    I was worried that a rolling pin was involved, but this was shockingly easy. I messed up, and there was a hole in the galette, so it leaked out while it baked. Didn’t matter – turned out awesome. Served with whipped cream (mixed together heavy cream, caster sugar, dash of vanilla). “It tastes like it’s from a restaurant” – words spoken to me.

  27. Amina

    SO delicious and easy! I was generous with the sugar and ended up baking for 36 minutes, but would have left them longer in the oven to make them crispier per my tastes. Love this, thank you Deb!

  28. Shannon

    Love how your baking recipes are always so simple & well written! If I were to “slick the bottom of the crust with marzipan”, do I need to add anything to it to make it spreadable or just crumble it on? Thanks!

  29. Jodie

    I was hoping to make 2 small gallettes as gifts. Can dough be divided in two and then chilled and the fruit split between the two?

  30. Paula

    So good and easy too! I used 1/4 cup of buckwheat flour in the crust, and apricots and sweet cherries flavored with a splash of almond extract and lemon zest. Yum!!!

  31. Jillian

    I’ve followed this blog for many years, though I’ve never commented. My 10 year-old just made this with no help whatsoever. She used some strawberries that were on their way out and some (frozen) rhubarb from last year. It is simple, yet delicious! We will definitely make it again!!

  32. Cherelle

    Made the crust with a scale (first time using one) and know now I understand why it’s so helpful. I used ricotta because I didn’t have yogurt or sour cream. So flaky. Filled with bing cherries that weren’t so ripe, so added extra 5g sugar and some vanilla extract. Deb thank you for this it’s so gorgeous and simple.

  33. Susan in Peckham

    Yum! I made this yesterday with 3 nectarines and a punnet of raspberries (and a slick of raspberry conserve beneath the fruit). Absolutely delicious! It was too much for just me so I’ve distributed half the galette to three neighbours who I know will appreciate it (socially distant drop off at their front doors). Thanks so much!

  34. Serena

    Is there any reason I couldn’t halve this recipe? Our six year old just ate most of the strawberries and I was thinking I could make a half recipe.

  35. Ellen Anderman

    I made the Chicken Pot Pie dough for 2 large + 1 smaller pot pies (one for us and two to give to neighbors.) Dee-licious! I was left therefore with one “extra crust” which I notice as I read this recipe is very similar to this galette crust, minus its sugar. So today it’s my first galette ever (pie fan and family) with a handful of blackberries, raspberries and a stalk of rhubarb from my rhubarb bed. Thank you from a loooong time fan and recipe user sheltering in rural New Mexico. (Berries from grocery, though. Too high altitude for any kind of berry right now.)

  36. Deborah Masterson

    Might you be able to recommend a reliable method/ratio of substituting almond flour for wheat flour for making this recipe and or general baking purposes?

    1. deb

      Yes, I suggest in the notes that you can easily swap 1/2 cup here. I usually start with 1/3 swaps. If you think it can handle more without seeming too dry or brittle, then swap up to 3/4 cup whole wheat (or rye, which I also like here).

  37. Barbara

    The crust was nicely flakey. I used raspberries and blackberries and even with 2/3+ cup sugar, could have used more. I will definitely make again.

  38. Bee

    Hi Deb – Galettes, sweet and savory, creative and fun, have become a mainstay of my repertoire, thanks to you! I am curious though why you don’t put lemon juice in your galette pastry intended for sweet fillings. Seems the savory recipes do have it. Thanks!!

    1. deb

      I don’t find that lemon juice really carries that much here, especially with a strongly flavored filling. For a lemon flavor, I’d use lemon zest in the crust.

  39. Julie

    Maybe I missed this but can some of the baked gallette be frozen? I live alone and I’m not having any friends coming over right now obviously!

  40. Lindsay

    I saw this on your Instagram feed and as usual gathered the stuff to make one! I made two, strawberry rhubarb and blackberry. I think this is my favorite way to eat fruit and crust! Such a great recipe, thank you!

  41. Katie

    We made this last night. And just had to tell you that my teenage son asked me to teach him how to make this before he heads off to college. I’d say this recipe is a huge hit!

  42. Angela Stark

    I saw this pop up on the homepage and ran out to our new reopened farmers market to get the berries. The crust is absolutely amazing. So flaky and easy to work with!!! Thank you!

  43. Hendrik

    This is what your strawberries look like after 35′ in the oven ! Are you sure they were grown in this here galaxy? Mine are a rather unappetizing mess.

  44. Bonita Pietila

    Can I make the dough in advance and freeze it? for how long can I keep it frozen? I’m giving birth at the beginning of August and I was planning to freeze doughs in mid-July so when people come to see the baby I can just pop it out and lay it flat, fill it, oven, and woooow everybody’s impressed at my baking skills with a newborn! :D

    1. deb

      You can freeze it before baking or after. And everyone should be baking for you in August (but I do remember the joy of having my own food, exactly the way I liked it most, even when I didn’t have time to make it). Good luck!

  45. Sarah

    I haven’t made this specific recipe, but in response to the questions about frozen fruit – I’ve had more success with using frozen fruit in pie when I thawed the fruit first in a colander, reserving some but by no means all of the liquid melt-off. I came to this after failing to find a consensus online about using frozen fruit in pie, but concluding that just putting in still-frozen rhubarb – even with extra cornstarch – resulted in (delicious) pie soup.

  46. Alison Manthei

    I made this today using a combination of fresh raspberries (3/4 c), blackberries (3/4 c), and strawberries (2 c) – the colors are beautiful. I didn’t chop the raspberries, but did the other fruit and added the full recommendation of tapioca flour. The mixture was pretty juicy when it sit, so I didn’t pour all of the liquid into the galette.

    For the crust, I only used 1.5 TBS of water. I can’t imagine using a full 3! It’s been very humid here in the midwest though with rain the past few days, so I know my kitchen is different now than if I made this at another time.

    Cook time was a few minutes over the full 40 recommended. Juice started to leak out around 30 minutes, but wasn’t a big deal and was in a part of the crust that was a little crumbly to start. It set beautifully on the counter and the first piece tonight was a dream! Looking forward to breakfast tomorrow now…

    I will definitely use this recipe over the summer anytime I have fruit starting to take a turn quickly – can’t wait to make it again with how fast and easy it all was.

  47. Barbara Uziel

    Made this with mostly strawberries with maybe 1/2 cup rhubarb, which is all I could get from my garden. Also, I had Minute Tapioca which I used instead of the tapioca flour. It came out perfect and was delicious! The crust was easy to roll out. The juices did leak out during baking but firmed up when cooled. Definitely will make again.

  48. Esvee

    This was exquisite! A neighbor gave me a rhubarb which I had never cooked with before today. I made it with 3.5 cups sliced rhubarb and used 1/4 cup sugar. It was just a little sweet which means it can be breakfast tomorrow:) I didn’t have tapioca starch, so I used arrowroot powder instead. I did end up using rye flour in the crust which was amazing.

    Deb, thank you for another perfect recipe!

    1. Esvee

      Also, before adding the rhubarb filling, I sprinkled the crust with almond meal. This was something I remember reading David Lebovitz did with rhubarb pies, maybe to keep the crust from getting soggy? Anyway it worked, I didn’t have the runniness others mentioned, although maybe that’s less an issue with just rhubarb.
      I dug up and gave away a giant rhubarb plant in my yard because it just wasn’t something I’d ever cooked with, and now I’m really regretting it because I want to make this again!
      I imagine this crust recipe will be amazing with late summer plums.

  49. Cathy

    Thanks Deb this was just perfect for a beginner baker like me, I made a fruit galette with apples, pears and a handful of cherries.

  50. Melissa Lewis

    Looks amazing! Can I do the mixing with my food processor? I have some sensory issues with dry flour, but I know some recipes really benefit from a hands on approach.

    1. deb

      You can do the butter-into-flour part but I recommend mixing the water and sour cream in by hand, i.e. with a spatula or spoon. To further run the FP at this point, the butter ends up getting too small and the final crust is less flaky.

  51. Susan

    I love this crust. I put the crust in a pie plate instead of on a cookie sheet so I could pile up the filling and contain any juices if the crust cracked. I may do that more often with other pies so I only have to roll out (the biggest PIA of pie making) one crust I didn’t this time, but I might also use some crumble toppings in the future. Delicious, Deb!

  52. I am making it now with thinly slice lemons (macerated in sugar for over a week!) I pout way too much of the syrupy juice so it’s bubbling over and I can smell the burning sugar in the oven…. oops. I hope it tastes good. Fingers crossed.

  53. Ellen

    I loved the taste of this, but the juice ran everywhere and the bottom crust was soggy. I used 1 cup of rhubarb and 2.5 cups of strawberries, as well as suggested 1.5 T of cornstarch. Any suggestions for next time? Thanks!

  54. Jean

    Delicious! I used a combination of fresh blackberries and raspberries with some frozen blueberries. I let the berries thaw while the dough was chilling. An easy, appealing dessert that is great for breakfast the next day.

  55. Jae

    If I wanted to make individual serving sized galettes, how many do you think I could make from this recipe? The recipe says serves 8, but should I aim for 4 individuals? Or do you think I could sneak in 6?

  56. Ria

    so delicious! i added the zest of a lemon and 1 tsp of vanilla extract, and 1 tbsp of cornstarch instead of tapioca, to the strawberries, and also 1 tsp of vanilla and a dash of cinnamon to the dough, which only needed 2-3 tbsps of cold liquid (i used hard cider). can’t wait to make this again (:

  57. Hillary

    I made this today with fresh rhubarb and strawberries from the farmers market. The strawberries were dark red, juicy and sweet. Rhubarb is less sweet. I used the recommended sugar amount in the filling and found the finished product to be barely sweet. Obviously everyone’s fruit is different and preference for sweetness is different. However if I made this again, I would absolutely increase the sugar in the filling. Without it, it doesn’t seem very dessert like – maybe with sweet ice cream on top. The crust was easy to work with. I made it the night before and rolled it out the next morning. I used all the water called for in the recipe and used 5% fage Greek yogurt. I had no issues with too much juice, no soggy bottom.

  58. Jennifer Kerr

    I made this with my garden’s fresh rhubarb. It was really good but I think next time I will cook the rhubarb a little first.

  59. Sarah

    I made this with fresh strawberries and lime juice, and 5% greek yogurt (with a little extra water) in the dough. It was glorious and beautiful, and as everyone has said, so easy. I can always count on you to give me something scrumptious, Deb. Thank you!

  60. Dawn McNiven

    This was lovely dough to roll out. It was so easy! I just love your website! Rhubarb is just right here in Canada, so I went with Strawberry Rhubarb! Put a smile on everyone’s faces. And isn’t that the goal in baking?!

  61. This looks so yummy! I haven’t use the tapioca flour to make this but have used cornstarch when making strawberry pies and that still leaves them a bit runny. Gonna try tapioca and see if that gives a better consistency

  62. Soo Hyun Han-Harris

    I made this galette – three times! It was my first time making a galette, and it was ridiculously easy and DELICIOUS. Happy that summer fruits are here! I’ve used a combination of peaches, blueberries, cherries and apricots. Whipped up some cream with a touch of sugar to put on top. Summertime perfection. In the fall I’m going to try this with persimmons. Thanks!