crispy peach cobbler Recipes

crispy peach cobbler

I cannot resist a recipe that promises an odd outcome. To wit, prior to stumbling upon this curiosity in the wonderful A Boat, A Whale and a Walrus, an assembly of recipes and stories from restaurants on the other side of the country that I am now extra-sad I haven’t been to (yet! Like maybe in 5 or 18 years or so?), I understood cobblers to be more or less baked fruit topped with a soft cake batter or plush biscuit, while crisps had clusters of oaty and sometimes nutty cookie-like crumbs giving them their namesake texture. [Let us save comparisons with crumbles, grunts, fools, pandowdys, sonkers, bettys, buckles and slabs for another delicious day.] Crisps were not soft; cobblers were not crisp.


it was hard not to eat these all
into thick wedges

But not this one. Here, in technique that Renee Erickson, the author and chef, says she was handed down from the original owner of one of her restaurants, The Boat Street Café, a rather simple flour/butter/sugar/milk batter is beaten for longer than any proper cake recipe would usually advocate, spread thinly over unpeeled peaches that have been dressed only with lemon zest and juice — no thickeners, spices or sugar — coated with more sugar and then drizzled with hot water. In the oven, the batter develops a crisp lid that is as fun to impatiently tap your way through as the best crème brûlée.

batter, prepped peaches
dollops of batter
batter spread thin
hot water dribbled on top

It’s also kind of a mess beneath the surface, the glurping, sloshy, summery type. The peaches are going to slide around until they’ve cooled a bit and thicken up, and you should wait 30 minutes for this to happen or waive any textural complaints. Sure, you could add thickener, but I’ve never liked the way they muffle the flavor of baked stone fruits. Because the lid is a bit sweet, this is better with a drizzle of cold cream or dollop of crème fraîche than it would be with the usual scoop of vanilla ice cream or sweetened whipped cream. Mostly, however, this was a bonafide hit, as should be no surprise, given that it’s late August and the peaches in New York this year are the best I’ve had north of South Carolina and this provides all of the deliciousness of a classic peach pie — sweet collapsed fruit, a flaked buttery lid — with about 1/10 of the work.

crispy peach cobbler
crispy peach cobbler
crispy peach cobbler + cold cream

One year ago: Smoky Eggplant Dip and Strawberries and Cream with Graham Crumbles
Two years ago: Almond-Crisped Peaches and Key Lime Pie Popsicles
Three years ago: Leek Chard and Corn Flatbread
Four years ago: Naked Tomato Sauce
Five years ago: Eggplant Salad Toasts and Perfect Blueberry Muffins
Six years ago: Summer Pea and Roasted Red Pepper Pasta Salad, Lobster Rolls and Espresso Chiffon Cake with Fudge Frosting
Seven years ago: Key Lime Meltaways and Grilled Eggplant With Caponata Salsa
Eight years ago: Summer Berry Pudding, Mixed Bean Salad and Brownie Mosaic Cheesecake

And for the other side of the world:
Six Months Ago: Pecan Sticky Buns + News! and Perfect Corn Muffins
1.5 Years Ago: Chocolate Peanut Butter Cheesecake and Stuck-Pot Rice with Lentils and Yogurt
2.5 Years Ago: Fried Egg Sandwich with Bacon and Blue Cheese
3.5 Years Ago: French Onion Tart

Crispy Peach Cobbler
Adapted, just barely, from A Boat, A Whale and a Walrus

P.S. I halved this recipe and made it in 2 1-quart baking dishes. It did not affect baking time.

4 1/2 pounds (about 10 large or 2 kg) peaches, unpeeled, cut into 1-inch chunks or slices (I cut mine each into 8 wedges)
Zest and juice of 1 lemon
4 ounces (115 grams) unsalted butter, softened
2 cups (400 grams) granulated sugar, divided (I reduced this to 1 1/2 cups, and recommend the same)
1 1/2 cups (190 grams) all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon coarse or kosher salt
3/4 cup milk (whole is ideal; almond will work too)
1/2 cup hot water
Heavy cream, cold, for drizzling

Heat oven to 350°F (175°C). Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil, to catch drips, or regret it later.

Prepare the peaches: Place the peaches in a 9×13-inch baking pan and in roughly an even layer. Using a zester or a Microplane, finely zest the lemon evenly over the peaches and then squeeze the lemon juice evenly over the peaches, too, catching any seeds before they fall in.

Make the batter: With an electric mixer, beat butter and 3/4 of the sugar (1 1/2 cups if you use the full amount; 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons if you reduce it as I did) with sugar until sandy, about 1 minutes. Add the flour, baking powder and salt and beat until combined, about 30 seconds, then lower the speed and slowly mix in milk. Continue beating at a medium speed for 2 minutes more, until light and fluffy-ish.

Assemble cobbler: Plop the batter in a large blobs over the peaches. Using my favorite $3.20 kitchen tool, a small offset spatula, or if you don’t have one, a butter knife, carefully spread the batter evenly over the fruit so that it’s no more than 1/2-inch thick in any place. Sprinkle with remaining sugar and drizzle the hot water evenly over the sugar.

Bake cobbler: Place the baking dish on the foil-lined baking sheet and bake for 60 to 70 minutes, until the top is cracked and golden brown, and a toothpick inserted into the topping comes out batter-free. (It’s best to start checking it at 60 minutes.)

Be patient: Let the cobbler sit in the baking dish on a wire rack for at least 30 minutes before serving, which will feel (and smell) like torture, but gives the peach juices a chance to slightly thicken up. To serve, scoop into bowls and drizzle with heavy cream.

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211 comments on crispy peach cobbler

  1. Such a sweet girl!

    I borrowed this book from the library in the spring time — which now seems like a lifetime ago. I wasn’t totally dazzled by it, but I think that has a lot to do with all the creatures of the sea recipes — ones that most people would be scampering to make, but not so for me. Was there some sort of apple preserves recipe in the book, or am I confusing that with another?

    In any event, peaches are pretty extraordinary here right now as well. Just discovered a nearby farm that has the most amazing doughnut peaches. I made people sniff them — didn’t actually share them, but close enough.

  2. Nicole B.

    I was planning on making a peach and blueberry crisp this weekend but I think I’ve just decided to make a cobbler instead!

  3. Lauren

    That looks amaze-balls! But I must ask – what’s with the hot water? Does it somehow contribute to the en-crispening of the crust? I’ve never seen such a thing – is it ok if some of it seeps into the peaches, or should one make an effort to “seal” the top with batter carefully spread to the edges?

  4. Mel

    This looks incredible. I can’t wait to make it this weekend.
    Your baby is ridiculous. She is so adorable it’s not even funny. The pictures/video have this effect…think Marisa Tomei stomping her foot in My Cousin Vinny..
    :)

  5. Cindy

    Looks fabulous! So looking forward to trying this but one question…at what point do you add the milk? I see the hot water goes last but can’t find the milk in the instructions.

  6. Pam

    I’ve been to the Walrus and Carpenter, you’d hate, don’t let it bother you (and if you believe that I’ve got some land in Florida to sell…).

    Hmm, I love crispy. So, is it this recipe or the bourbon peach hand pies? Half of both? Time will tell.

  7. Christine

    This is oddly similar to the cobbler recipe I learned in 8th grade home ec! In South Carolina, where we know our peaches (and they ARE good this year). Except the batter was on the bottom and then peaches, then sugar and water.

  8. john burke

    This is a very interesting recipe–thanks, Deb. Here in Northern California peach season is almost over but I hope there will be some at the Ferry Building market Saturday–if so, I’ll make cobbler this weekend. I’m on the fence about thickener with stone fruit but lean towards Yes. A pro pastry chef told me tapioca starch gives the same thickening effect as cornstarch, with less of the starch added, so that’s what I use. But I forgot it last time I made peach pie and guess what, it was delicious anyway, just a little runnier than usual. How can you go wrong with fresh peaches, after all?

  9. I can already tell this idea is going to haunt me until I try it. It looks fantastic with peaches, but I’m already thinking ahead to fall, mixing that crust with pears or apples.

  10. Charlotte in Toronto

    I’ve been up to my armpits in peaches for the last week. Canned Brandied peaches, pies, cobblers, and this weekend I’m gonna get some more and do it all over again. This recipe will be on my list. It’s been a good year for Niagara peaches. It looks like all regions have had a winning year.

  11. nikki

    This is the cobbler recipe I’ve been looking for!
    Every other recipe I’ve found was just not quite the right texture. Can’t wait to make this!!

  12. A question–how well does this keep to the next day? The thing that always frustrates me about cobblers in particular is that they get inedibly mushy basically overnight–which is always a shame when one of my favorite things about summer fruit dessert is an excuse to have them for breakfast.

  13. Sarah

    Unfortunately, Renee has closed up shop on Boat Street (about a week after I learned of its existence, and I live just down the street, wahh!), but her other restaurants are going (very) strong, and sometimes it seems like she’s adding more every day!

  14. Sarah

    …follow up, there is an iteration of Boat Street that is still open – Boat Street Kitchen, but not sure how similar it is to the original!

  15. Amanda S

    I’m making this tonight! Peaches are in season in Colorado and SO AMAZING. They’re on sale for 99 cents/lb at my local grocery, so your timing is perfect.

  16. Shari

    Oh my, I’m off to see about some peaches. I also love recipes that promise or at least hint at an odd outcome. I must know what happens! My Grandma made ‘cobblers’ in a rectangular pan with the fruit mixture juicier than a pie and lattice strips of pie crust on top.

  17. Nadia

    Deb, this looks amazing! Would you happen to know for how long it stays crispy? I’m wondering if I can bake it the night before and have it for breakfast. =D

  18. Allison

    Can this be prepared ahead of time, and then popped into the oven? What do you think? And how about topping it with unsweetened whipped cream?

  19. Hallie

    This looks fabulous! Also wondering about the leftovers question.
    Buuutttt, as good as this looks, I’ve been ready to run to the store as soon as you post the eggplant caponata recipe after seeing the photos last week. Eagerly awaiting your genius!

  20. Anne

    Deb: Do you have some cosmic link to my head? I just picked up a big ol bag of peaches at the San Francisco Ferry Building Farmer’s Market, and was about to look for a cobbler type thing to do with them. Every.Time. You do this every.single.time. The raw tomato sauce? Bowl of FM tomatoes sitting on the counter. Swear to gawd.

  21. Lauren

    That is one darling little “lambie lover”. She is already communicating so well, I hqd forgotten how quickly they become “people”, it’s so amazing. Apparently she is willing to let you read a cookbook or two, allows you to cook simple goodies which we all love, and then crank up the mobile for a couple of laughs. What a gal! I am so glad she let you find this cobbler…can’t wait to get peaches at the farmer’s market on Saturday.

  22. p.j. in STL

    Deb & Family – A belated mazel tov on the birth of your beautiful daughter! May you enjoy many sweet and healthy years together, as well as some decent sleep!

    Would I be correct if I assumed that nectarines would also work in this recipe? I just came back from the farmer’s market with 4 lbs. of delicious (burp!) ripe ones: for $2.
    Also, do you think skim milk would work o.k.?
    Thanks, p.j.

  23. Annie

    Ooh, I just bought a flat of peaches from Costco. I know the three of us will never eat all of them before they start to mush. Perfect timing!

  24. deb

    Staying crispy — It’s less so, but still in some places, on the 2nd day. It will not exist for a 3rd. :)

    Making this ahead of time — I probably wouldn’t let the batter sit unbaked on the cobbler because the baking powder will start working as soon as you mix it and might be “dead” by morning. But you can always rewarm it a little after baking it the day before.

    Amanda — Yes, halve it. I halved in into 2 smaller (1 quart) dishes but a 9×9 is about 2 quart, which is just right.

    john burke — I find this too about tapioca. It’s very strong and it’s also very clear. But I still prefer some baked fruit dishes loose; the taste of thickened fruit isn’t always pleasant, or as clean/clear as these peach juices with lemon were.

    Mel — Oh me too and we are all AT CAPACITY with babies right now. :)

  25. Oh. my. goodness. Being a Louisiana girl living in Texas, peaches are in my blood. I have never seen anything like this which means, I can’t wait to try this! You’ve done it again, Deb!
    And you also make adorable little people!

  26. Anne

    I just read somewhere that the polar vortices of the last couple of winters are what’s causing all the stone fruits to be so good this year, so at least if we have to deal with another one of those this winter, we can think fondly of the cherry/peach/plummy rewards to come.

  27. Jody

    I’ve been using a similar recipe from Marcia Adams’s Cooking From Quilt County. I will try this version and compare them!

  28. Angela

    This is like the cobbler I grew up on! The magazine clipping on mom’s fridge was titled “Bailey’s Shiny-Top Cobbler”. I love making it, though the boiling water pouring is always a bit scary.

  29. Linnie C

    This is a fascinating variation of our family favorite cobbler recipe that we found in a cookbook in a beach house we rented: Hunt to Harbor, Junior League of Baltimore, 1985. The ingredients for the batter are the same, but the proportions are very different. The similarity is the water/sugar topping. In ours, you mix 1 cup sugar in 1/2 cup hot water and pour over the batter. You are right about none being left on the 3rd day!

    In ours, I use Splenda in the batter but it doesn’t work for the topping. I once tried using 7-Up; it was ok – a good sub if you’re out of sugar, but it wasn’t any better. Looking forward to trying yours and seeing the comparison of the two.

  30. Susan

    OK, just made this tonight and our daughter thought it was the best thing she’d ever eaten. Thank you for shooting me to the top of the mom chart around here! And tonight our son made the zucchini fritters. It was just bliss all around.

  31. JP

    Yellow peaches are one of the most wonderful parts of summer. I can not get worked up at all about a white peach. They do nothing for me. Give me a wonderful cling free peach such as that old favorite Elberta and I will always be happy. As long as they are dead ripe, they are the perfect fruit, baked like this recipe I would love to try or just peeled fresh. When I was first married, my mother in law said to us, after we finished eating the dinner she made for us: Go out and pick your dessert. Oh, those peaches looked like a sunset and tasted like heaven. Thanks for a new recipe!

  32. What an interesting looking pudding. I’ve never actually had a cobbler, in the UK it is generally crumbles and pies we eat here.

    I always thought a cobbler had rounds of dough sat on top of them? However you did say that this is a different type of cobbler, is it more like an upside down cake?

  33. Amy G

    Wow, this is my Mom’s cobbler recipe, copied from a call-in to a radio station in West Virginia, to the letter! I love this method. In Mom’s version you stir sugar into the hot water instead of sprinkling the sugar on top. The hot water seeps into the fruit and makes it syrupy and wonderful, and the sugar left behind on the crust turns crisp and golden. I make this with mixed berries most of the time. It always gets rave reviews.

  34. I was planning on baking a peach blueberry pie, and bought the peaches and blueberries to do so, but have YET to make my pie crust (lazy summer days and all… haha). So those peaches have just been sitting in my refrigerator waiting to be baked into something, and, as always Deb, you have pulled out the most perfect, simple recipe out of nowhere!! Love it and your blog, and by the way, ADORABLE little girl!

  35. Margy

    This sounds wonderful, which makes me sad. Does every American person but me have AC in the kitchen? Does no one else live in an apartment too hot to bake in during the summer? In which you feel pretty sous-vided yourself? Another first world problem. Still ….

  36. Mrs C. La Singe

    Too too perfect! We are in need of a new fresh fruit dessert and it’s cool enough to turn on the oven.

    I figure those raspberries, blueberries and a few remaining blackberries in the frig that I thought I’d freeze for winter will get socked into a cobbler tonight. I wasn’t planning on baking yet but this is too fantastic to not.

    THANK YOU Deb.

  37. Sharon

    I love your recipes. I have tried several and they are all delicious and enjoyed by my family. Peach season is so short and sweet. They are my favorite fruit. I will try this recipe for sure.

  38. I love fruit desserts and will be trying this. My grandmother and mother both made cobblers with homemade pie crust strips so that’s the way I grew up knowing cobblers. We are getting some really nice peaches now in Texas so this will be next on my list to try. Thanks.

  39. Cynthia PNW

    My husband shared a family favorite cobbler recipe with me when we got married 30 years ago call Saw Log Springs Cobbler, AKA Anne Warner’s Cobbler, from Dodge City Kansas. In this recipe you do use cornstarch mixed with sugar sprinkled on the dollops, and then hot water poured over the top. Nice tappy crust. It is a hit everytime. Is it still crispy the next day? We can’t seem to FIND it the next day!

  40. After years of thinking cobblers should only be topped with biscuit dough, I just posted a very similar recipe for batter-topped peach cobbler on my own site. The recipe I relied on calls for mixing a little cornstarch with the sugar topping, but it looks like you got the essentially same effect with no cornstarch, so I’m eager to try it that way too.

  41. Mary B.

    The peach cobbler looks delicious, and since I have lovely fresh peaches on the counter and grandchildren coming for a sleepover, I have no doubt it will get made this weekend!
    But, oh, the video of Anna! It made my heart twist a bit inside; those days of infancy are so incredibly precious and yet so fleeting. Clearly I don’t need to tell you to savor every moment, because you already are. Best wishes to you all.

  42. Courtney

    Oh, wow. I might have to try that one. My go-to cobbler recipe is the Butter Cookie topping from Pam Anderson’s Mix & Match cobbler recipe in The Perfect Recipe. (She has several other topping options, along with a page that gives guidelines on mixing up a variety of fruit fillings (cornstarch, spice & extract amounts, with ranges for sugar amount depending on the sweetness of your fruit.) The cookie topping is made just like a sugar cookie dough without any brown sugar: butter, white sugar, flour, eggs, vanilla extract, and a tiny bit of salt blended with the creaming method. It bakes up both crispy and chewy, and the dough freezes beautifully. If you haven’t tried it, you should. (Also, I heartily recommend that cookbook as a whole. I have yet to have one of its recipes turn out less than amazing. The title isn’t hyperbole.)

  43. Kate

    Don’t know where I first learned this trick, but if you shred a peeled granny smith apple and add that to the filling, the pectin will help congeal the contents, and the shreds will just disintegrate and be unnoticeable. Works really well for pies with berries and stone fruit. I tried this with the cobbler last night and it was delightful!

  44. FH Stowe

    This is very similar to a recipe I have using apples. Sorry I can’t credit the source at the moment; I don’t have access to my books. It’s an old community cookbook. The batter here looks a little thicker, though not much.

  45. Clara

    Boat Street is still wonderful. A great place for lunch and brunch! That book is a beauty and this cobbler just went to the top of my to bake list.

  46. I was wondering if you could add sliced almonds to the topping. Do you think they would burn too quickly? This looks delicious and I have peaches growing wrinkly on my kitchen island.

  47. Susan

    The first cobbler I ever made had water poured over the top of a batter. It was delicious but I lost the recipe so I never made it again. It was way before the
    internet was available. This technique reminds me of one I use for cookies that are rolled into balls then in sugar. You dampen a fingertip and dot the sugared cookie dough top with it. The cookies flatten and come out with a sparkly, crackled top where the sugar melts then cracks as the cookie expands. Gives you that same light crispy shell effect without being a heavy coating. …this recipe just reminded me of it for some reason..

  48. My three-year-old and I made this yesterday with pick-your-own white peaches. We did the full recipe, but divided it into two 8x8s – one for us and one to take to a get-together this evening.

    I don’t know if it was because we used white peaches (my absolute favorite), but I felt that the lemon flavor overpowered the peach flavor. My husband’s response to this was, “Ok, more for me.” He loved it and also had it for breakfast this morning.

  49. Janet

    Thanks for the idea. As it is winter in Perth, Australia I made it with rhubarb and raspberry, using orange juice and rind as the liquid. It was beautiful with raspberry ice cream.

  50. Anne

    This was fantastic! I halved the recipe, and made it in an oval Le Creuset casserole. My peaches were a tad underripe, so I used the full amount of sugar; I recommend doing the same if your peaches aren’t very sweet. The lemon zest was a nice touch, although I might use a little less next time.

  51. pjcamp

    “I understood cobblers to be more or less baked fruit topped with a soft cake batter or plush biscuit”

    No, no, no. Only Yankees put biscuits on a cobbler. Cobblers are covered with a pastry crust that gets all dumplingy.

  52. Couldn’t resist but to make it! I made it this morning and it’s delicious. I love the crisp top. It’s very similar to a blueberry cobbler I make. I enjoyed this Crispy Peach Cobbler with a nice bold cup of coffee. I can’t wait to enjoy to a glob with vanilla ice cream later. Thanks for the share!

  53. Julia

    This recipe looks amazing! Can I cut the ingredients in half and make just one 9″ cobbler? From the looks of it, your recipe would yield enough for two 9″ pie plates worth?

  54. Hi, I feel a little silly asking but when you say you “halved *this* recipe” are you saying you halved the recipe that you posted, or that the recipe that you posted has already been halved from the source you adapted it from? I am guessing the former but wanted to be sure.

  55. This looks so incredibly good! I love that it’s a combination of crisp and cakey on the top. I also find that too much thickener can not only subdue the flavor or stone fruits but add its own starchy flavor too, so the fact that this recipe doesn’t utilize one is awesome. So beautiful, Deb!

  56. This is in my oven right now! I have a VERY pregnant friend who got super excited about peach cobbler.

    I added a little cinnamon to the peaches and a little vanilla to the batter, and did half and half white/brown sugar. So far it smells AMAZING.

  57. I just made this. I actually halved the recipe because I only had 5 large peaches.
    I found it too sweet so I would reduce the sugar again. Also, I cooked it a full 60 minutes and while the crust was brown-golden it is not what I would call a crispy crust.

  58. hi Deb; love love your blog. I make most of your posts…some of them many times. Looking forward to making the crispy peach (which have been outstanding this year) cobbler.
    I am computer illiterate but would love to see pics of your children. Occasionally there is a link which I am able to see but seem to be missing out on Anna + anything new of Jake (I have a Jake, too…15 1/2 and driving soon!!) and the video which everyone is talking about.
    Please, Please help.
    thank you,

    ism

  59. Lauren

    I made this today and my crust did not turn out as crispy as I would have liked. I halved the recipe and think the dish I cooked it in was too deep. Your pictures show a shallower cooking dishes. So delicious tho! Next time I make this I will reduce the lemon as it was a little too noticeable. I loved making this and it is in my recipes to pass down to my daughter. So easy and yummy!

  60. Kathleen

    I just made it…added a few nectarines that needed to be eaten..
    We waited about 10 minutes before diving our forks and spoons in..
    A memory of summertime when we would head up to the Okanagan and buy big boxes of peaches picked that morning fresh from the orchard..
    Dad driving carefully during the five hours it took to get home so that the peaches wouldn’t bruise..
    My mom would can them…save some to be eaten..the first bite sending its juice down our chins..
    This recipe was excellent..even the cat licked my fingers..
    Next time I will use less sugar..in my opinion it doesn’t need a whole lot as the peaches are so lovely sweet standing alone.

  61. Currants

    The first mixing time (butter sugar) says “1 minutes”–is there a zero missing (10 minutes)? I ask because you said it’s a longer mixing time than for the usual cake batter, and it’s not clear if that’s from the combined mixing times or if there’s a missing digit. I also have a couple of Swedish recipes that mix the first ingredients for a VERY long time (butter, sugar, sometimes egg, in either case, whipping until a pale lemon color) with excellent results.

  62. Monica

    looks so yummy! can’t wait to bake! to feed my cookware obsession, which Staub roasting (?) pan are you using? Is it the 6-inch?

  63. Marie

    I made this today and cut the recipe in half because I only had so many peaches. And I didn’t have a lemon so I used (horrors!) bottled lemon juice. But I really wanted to try it. Absolutely amazing, even with my shortcuts. I’ll be making it properly when I can get some more peaches. The voice in the other room, that belongs to my boyfriend, is telling me that I *have* to tell you that it’s the best cobbler he’s ever had. Pretty strong endorsement.

  64. Laura

    I made this yesterday when we had some friends over. I cut the recipe in half and it was perfect! We ate it with plain yogurt, which was a really nice contrast to the sweetness of the topping. I heated up the leftovers for breakfast, it was still delicious in the morning. Thanks for the recipe!

  65. candice

    This is very similar to my great-grandmother’s cobbler recipe. For ours I mix all of the dry and wet with butter melted in the pan, then drop in fruit. The proportions are really similar and it scales up and down great. I try to keep it thin so you get the crispy bits.

    It was a dish I made with a two month old last year.

  66. Barbara

    This was truly delicious, and great fun to crack open the crust! I could not resist adding a little potato starch to the peaches. Just a teense.

  67. Sheryll

    WOW Smitten Kitchen you are rockin’ in our house today. This morning I turned your multi-grain yogurt pancakes into a muffin for breakfast. Yummy! Then this evening made this scrumptious crispy peach cobbler for dessert. I loved the ease with which this dessert came together given the quirky technique. Peaces from the western slope of Colorado were perfect. Thank you for sharing!

  68. Kathleen

    ok..I just saw the video of your sweet little girl..
    Loved hearing your little boy in the background too..
    Thank you for sharing with all of us

  69. Mel in Durham

    I made this tonight for potluck with neighbors and folks were practically licking out their bowls. I used all of the sugar and had no regrets. I served the cobbler with Jeni’s maple ice cream with buttered nuts, made in my little Cuisinart. The combination of maple and buttery pecans is great with peaches. I also had some cherries I froze earlier in the summer and threw a handful of those in with the peaches, a combo of regular peaches and white. I am the type of cobbler person that likes the topping better than the fruit and I loved the crunchy lid. I’ve been making a peach cobbler from an 80s southern living cookbook for ages but think I’ve found myself a new go-to recipe. and there’s just enough left to have some for breakfast!

  70. Jessica

    I read this post on Thursday and by the time I got to the recipe I’d put Renee’s cookbook on hold at the library. Made the cobbler on Friday and it was amazing–probably my new go-to. We managed to stretch it out to Sunday night, but it was still wonderful. Next time I’ll split it into two dishes and pawn one off on the neighbors.

  71. Carol

    Peach season is slowing down and apples are coming in strong. Can I make this absolutely wonderful dish, that we’ve been eating for breakfast and dessert, with apples? If so, what type do you recommend?

  72. Alyssa D.

    Made this yesterday and it was delicous!!! Subbed in gluten free flour and nectarines because the farm stand was out of peaches. Served it with whipped cream and man it was so so good! I loved the crispy top and simple ingrediants that really let the fruit shine. The leftovers were awesome the next day as well.

  73. I’ve never been much of a baked peach person, but you got me with this one – it was delicious! I’m sure I can use that topping for many other baked fruits/berries too!

  74. Liz F.

    I made this recipe a couple of days ago. I halved it since I had only a few peaches. Turned out wonderfully. When I make it again I think I will serve it dusted with powdered sugar if I don’t serve it with the cream; would give it a nice presentation. Also, I cut the sugar to less than half what the recipe called for and it was plenty sweet. Thanks for posting this!

  75. Kathryn

    Turned out great – I used 1/2 cup of turbinado sugar on top. Created a wonderful darker crust. Can’t wait to eat it later!

  76. Topol

    “I halved this recipe and made it in 2 1-quart baking dishes.”

    Is this right? Are you saying that you split the recipe between two 1-quart baking dishes, or that the full recipe would make enough for four 1-quart baking dishes?

  77. HS

    This was amazing!!! Made it tonight. My new favourite dessert. Hands down. I loved the hard top. I halved the recipe since there are just two of us.

  78. Kathy

    This looks delicious! Are the peach skins required? Do they help the fruit set a bit? I try to avoid eating fruit skins because of pesticide issues (even organic).

  79. Hillary B

    I made this on Sunday night and was surprised by how much the topping puffed up and was very substantive. I used the full amount of the sugar and do not regret it (I like things sweet, though). I wish I had used more peaches. It was too much crust to fruit for me. It was a very easy recipe and came out well. However, probably not my favorite recipe, might stick to a traditional crisp topping next time.

  80. Andrea

    Just up over the border here in Toronto the peaches are also insanely good – the best local harvest in years! I will have to try this recipe, if I can manage to save any peaches from immediate consumption in their natural state!

  81. Hester

    I made this with a couple of tweaks; I used nectarines and lime instead of peach and lemon, and served it with a dollop of skyr (Icelandic strained yogurt; thicker and richer and creamier than Greek yogurt, and slightly milder, although it still has a touch of sharpness which complements the sweetness of the peaches and the crunch of the topping really well) because that’s what I had. The smell when it came out of the oven was _amazing_, and the finished dish is tender and perfume-y and delicious. I’m going to use the topping with other fruit too; it would be great with apple and blackberry, or rhubarb.

  82. deb

    Fran, Cathy — No reason not to peel them if you don’t like skins. I personally love the red color it imparts so I leave them on.

    Julia — It miiight fit in one? I know, this is a terrible answer but I feel like it might fit with a squeeze.

    Susan — Yes, I halved this (i.e. used 2.25 pounds peaches), and yes, I know it’s always confusing when written that way.

    Topol — Yes, exactly. You could fit this in a 4-quart dish or 4 1-quart dishes.

    Using apples — Use any kind you like to bake with. (I don’t really believe there is a best and worst, no matter what recipes tell you. Something fresh and crisp and maybe a little tart is always your best bet.)

  83. Heidi J

    I made this last night. It was excellent. I made it in a 9×13 glass casserole dish and it did take a good hour and half to cook though. The crisp topping was great, but was sadly soggy the next morning. Is there a good way to keep this to prevent it from getting soggy the next day?

  84. Deb: OMG….this peach cobbler was (it no longer exists!) fantabulous. I halved the peaches and added ME wild blueberries; I, also, used Turbinado sugar on top. Directions were very easy to follow; came together in just a few minutes. The anticipation was exhausting!
    thanks….

    ism

  85. Lisa O

    Okay…yum! Made this yesterday for a work breakfast and everyone raved. Unlike any other cobbler I ever made. Farmers Market peaches that were still too hard were transformed. I used full sugar and resisted the temptation to add cinnamon. I also appreciated your pictures, as I only used a thin layer of topping over the thin layer of peaches and threw away the rest of the batter rather than glopping it up. Did not notice the peach peels. Loved the ease of effort and fantastic result! Thank you!!!!!!

  86. Mary Beth

    I made this yesterday and adapted for a much smaller version and it turned out beautifully. I had only two peaches on hand, a handful each of raspberries and blueberries so used those. I cut batter recipe in 1/2 and like Lisa O, I did not use all the batter because of clear instructions. I did not have milk in the house so used fat-free half-n-half. It made a lovely two person dessert, loved the crust. I did cut the sugar significantly in the batter and was glad I did. I topped it with 0% fat free plain yogurt and I liked that very much.

    1. deb

      MR — They may not be perfect, but no book author is ever really free to swear them off. They were, in fact, insanely supportive of my first cookbook, far more than they ever had to be, promoting it in newsletters and lists and selling a tremendous volume. Furthermore, as ad money is rather up and down these days and I’m, as mentioned, not interested in sponsored content and have turned down several offers over the years to sell, the kickback they give on affiliate link purchases is helpful. So, you can imagine my pulled-in-different-directions position. I’m happy to discuss more, but I do think if we are criticize publications that link to Amazon, we’re essentially criticizing every publication. My goals, as always, are to create the most enjoyable experience possible for everyone who is nice enough to show up here, while monetizing it the quietest and least obtrusive ways that allow me to continue it. Uh, and also sleep well at night — i.e. make choices here I can feel good about — when either of my kids let me.

  87. tammi

    This is my moms recipe. Every year she makes me a blackberry cobbler for my birthday. I eat the entire pan over the course of the day…mixing ice cream on top. My mom serves it in bowls with milk and extra sugar on top…just like when i was little and ice cream was not an option. Thanks for posting the recipe…. it made me smile and call my mom to tell her how much I love and miss her….

  88. We recently went peach picking at a nearby farm and it was a wonderful experience. We had to fight with some more aggressive pickers who were there throwing elbows, but all in all it was fun and we laughed all the way home. We walked away in one piece and with funny anecdotes that lasted longer than the peaches themselves…In any case, I thank you for this recipe that I can now add to my arsenal. I love peaches but they go soft in a hurry and I think everyone will love this recipe…I’ll go, as always, the GF route because my health demands it (and now my child’s too) but I am quite sure it’ll be just as delicious.

  89. Emily

    I halved the recipe and replaced part of the flour with almond meal, because I love almonds with peaches. It was absolutely sublime.

  90. Jeff

    Made this with lime instead of lemon, it was delicious. Sloshing juices are to me the bane of most peach recipes but this ended up with a very modest amount of delicious juice. I agree that any thickening agent detracts. My brain exploding insight from this recipe is that it’s the sugar that’s the problem. It creates the osmotic gradient that sucks all the juice out of the peaches. The genius of this recipe is confining the added sweetener to the batter, limiting the sloshing juice problem while preserving the beautiful texture of the peaches.

  91. Anna

    I go to a cafe for lunch and I think they have something like this for dessert. I tried to look for a recipe like this but I could not find anything on the web that looked like what they make. This is the closest thing. It’s like you read my mind. It’s in the oven now. Thank you Deb:-)

  92. Anna

    I just remembered the cafe I go to has this ‘dough’ on the bottom and the top and then the peaches are in between the layers. It almost looks like what you made except there is enough dough to cut this into bars. Do you think I can put this dough on the bottom, put peaches on top and then cover it with this dough? Would this work? This recipe is delicious by the way:-) I only used 1 cup sugar but you were right in the 1.5 cups because the peaches do not have sugar on them.

  93. koj

    This was great! I think I accidentally used too much sugar (maybe because of halving the recipe? Maybe because I don’t like things as sweet as some people?) so I’m going to try to make it one more time before our tiny local(ish) peach window closes for the year (so like, Tuesday?). I’m sure I’ll find helpers to polish off the x-tra sweet version :) And it was soooooooooo pretty!

  94. Elaine

    I made this yesterday for a cookout. Today, I am making it again for my family. It is awesome! Thanks for the suggestion about using aluminum foil; that saved me from hours of oven scrubbing.

  95. Patricia

    I very much appreciated your thoughtful response to MJ RE: Amazon. Very few issues are cut-and-dried, and I think you hit the nail on the head describing the conflicts inherent to any complex decision. Your recipes are awesome and your writing is like frosting on top of (already awesome) cake. Keep up the great work!

  96. JoAnna

    I love this recipe! Just made it tonight as described in one 9×13 inch pan. Used the recommended lower level of sugar–still tastes fantastic! Nice crispy top. I cut up the peaches into little pieces to make it easier to scoop for my guests, and I was really happy with how it turned out. I needed a solid 70 minutes to cook through. Definitely tough to let it stand for 30 minutes once cooked, but it was nice and thick as a result. Thanks, Deb!

  97. kamila

    I baked this tonight (half the recipe, the lower amount of sugar) using coconut oil. My coconut oil is in a liquid state about 99% of the time (thank you Central Texas) but it turned out just fine. Even tho it’s nearly 11PM, I just ate a giant corner out of the pan following the 30 minute cooling – MMMMMM. Thank you Deb!

  98. Made this last night for the last hurrah of summer. I accidentally peeled all the peaches, which added prep time, but the cobbler came out just lovely. This was pretty easy to put together, and the results included perfectly cooked peaches (I strongly enforced the 30 min waiting period), fluffy cobbler, and the promised crispy crust on top. We at it with heavy cream and it was delightful. I did find myself wanting more peaches and wonder if I could add 50% more? While cooking, the crust puffed considerably, but happily, there were no spillovers. Folks who don’t care for a slight lemony flavor might want to cut back to the juice of half a fruit. However, I’ll say that our lemons in Toronto tend to be huge. I liked the lemony aftertaste, because it usually hits your senses just as you’re digging into the crispy crust. Last note: I used the recommended 1.5c of sugar and think the batter could possibly be reduced down to 1c as well.

  99. Kelly

    Hi Deb!
    I made this cobbler tonight and I used half the recipe in a round Corning ware dish. I baked it for almost 70 minutes and the top became crispy in the middle (like a lid) but all around and underneath is very gooey. Did I do something wrong? Tastes yummy but it’s very soft.

  100. Mila

    Deb: I can’t wait to try this cobbler version with the creme brulee’d crispy layer.

    If you’re in the mood for a few more peach recipes before fall fully kicks in, then please, please, please try the Browned Butter Peach Cobbler from Simply Scratch => http://goo.gl/IIsDxt

    It will rock your world! :)

  101. Yinny

    Sadly, there are no local peaches here in the Netherlands, but even with the Spanish peaches, this cobbler was great! Loved the warm peaches and the crispy batter! Thank you for testing, tweaking and posting this recipe, Deb!

  102. Cammy

    I made this today and it was awesome. I was out of milk and was wondering if half and half would work. It did. I halved the recipe so instead of 3/4 cup milk I needed 1.5/4 milk (1/4 plus 1/8 AKA 6 tablespoons of liquid but my mind apparently makes it WAY more complicated). I used 1/4 cup half and half and 1/8 water.

    I used two 1.5 quart baking dishes so it didn’t spill all over. I halved the recipe exactly except I had three huge peaches so I cut them up into chunks and it worked just fine.

    Served it room temp with a drizzle of heavy cream as suggested. Thanks Deb!

  103. Great recipe. I put some nutmeg and cinnamon in the peaches for more flavor and some cornstarch to thicken my peaches as they were juicy but other then that it was great and the topping I’ll use it on my apple crisp from now on. It stayed crisp even after a few day.

  104. Love this.

    We made something like this recently, and it’s excellent with a tiny bit of ginger and a healthy dash of cinnamon. I also like the bourbon suggestion in one of the earlier comments.

    Thanks for road testing this for us.

    -GK

    P.S. I’m seriously jealous of your cast iron. What type of pan is that? It doesn’t look like either a “skillet” or a “Dutch oven”?.

  105. Omar

    So good. The end of season peaches and nectarines made this like heaven. While mine came out great, I would say that the batter should probably be less than 1/2″ thick if you really want to see the fruit underneath. Dear Deb, while you seem to eat wayyy less meat than I, your recipes are always in my zone of absolute deliciousness and timeliness.

  106. Erica G

    I made this yesterday for my hubby and brought left overs into the office. It was a hit all around. What a lovely dish! I completely agree with you about halving the sugar in the recipe. Thank you for sharing, Deb. As always, I thoroughly enjoyed yet another recipe from you.

  107. trasheed

    I used the reduced amount of sugar as recommended, but I found it still a bit too sweet. I might try no sugar in the batter, and sugar only on top. The crunchy lid is very nice, the wet sugar caramelizes and it’s pretty great, but it only lasts the first day made. On day 2 and 3, its more like moist pancake and fruit, still good, but very different.

  108. Lauren

    Made this last night in two small dishes that were too deep for an adequate “look” of peachy splendor…but the two dishes now sit empty in my sink. I did share one of them with my cousin and three dinner guests tonight…but it was tough. Having eaten the first by myself last night and for breakfast this a.m., sharing was not my first inclination. That lemon touch is genius, and the crust is so yummy. It could use even less sugar though,so I can’t wait to do it again ( so I can give some to my children to “test”) This is the “look-no-farther-for-peach-cobbler” recipe. As usual, you have cut a lot of my old recipe cards in shreds with your awesome renditions of old favorites.

  109. Tawni

    Go and make this right now. This tasted how I have always thought a peach cobbler should be, with a delightful crunch. The peaches taste beautiful with the lemon zest and juice. But make sure you use the reduced amount of sugar. I halved this recipe and made it in an oval 1.2 L pan. When I was sprinkling the sugar on top, it seemed like a lot and it did end up being a bit too sweet for me (my husband thought it was fine though). When I make this again I think I would experiment using less sugar and perhaps putting a touch of vanilla in the batter. This is definitely going to be my go-to recipe for peach cobbler now. Thank you, Deb!

  110. Shevaun

    So this is the Best Thing Ever. Best. Ever.
    I reduced the sugar too and only had half the amount of peaches i was supposed to but theres no way a little detail like that was stopping me :)

  111. glammie

    Question: if I were to halve this because I’m a little short on peaches and it’s just my tween and I, would I halve the baking time as well? Just gimmer a guideline, if you could. Thank you.

  112. Tylor

    Fantastic, amazing and many other superlatives.

    Until the next day. Woke up to a soggy mess. Any advice on salvaging the leftovers or advice on how to prevent this next. I suppose we could all have 3x desert but I don’t think that’s a good plan over the long haul :P

  113. Chiming in for a second time to report on our second batch! Unpeeled peaches are a delicious time saver. This time, we doubled the peach quantity and sprinkled in some tiny, wild blueberries. The berries added a nice purple colour to the fruit, and just a hint of sourness that paired well with the sweet peaches and tangy lemon. Even with the extra fruit, the cobbler did not bubble over onto the cookie sheet. However, the increased fruit also meant that the cobbler lasted for more servings.

    I’m also happy to report that the crispy topping did actually stay pretty crispy in the fridge after three days. This recipe is delightful, and anything that you make twice in two weeks is a keeper!

  114. Mari

    Long-time listener, millionth time commenter. I am usually 100% down with SK recipes, but while everyone I shared it with loved it, this kind of fell flat with me. It is waaaaaay too sweet and the topping was weird. Maybe I’m just too southern to appreciate anything but a plain ‘ol cobbler. I followed the recipe exactly, maybe even baked it a few more minutes just to get the crust…crustier. Perhaps it needs some allspice, some cloves, a mixture of tart/sweet fruits, but maybe I’m just crazy, because my neighbor literally ate a quart of it in one sitting.

  115. kris

    This is now my husband’s (and everyone I’ve shared it with) favorite, favorite peach dessert! Before it was peach pie, so thank you for this recipe—saves me a bit a time! Now that peaches are hard to come by in the midwest I’m wondering if you think apples would work? Thoughts? Thank you for all the great recipes—and your wonderful writing!

  116. Elemjay

    Made this recipe at the weekend with a few left over nectarines and some apricots to boost it up a bit. We liked it a LOT. I used the reduced quantity of sugar and thought the level of sweetness was just about right – this is probably because the fruit I used were not top quality i.e. not super ripe or sweet. But the recipe made them taste awesome once cooked. Thanks SK!

  117. Brooks

    This turned out amazing. I too used the reduced sugar. My hubbie has declared this “perfect” and ordered me not to make any tweaks to it. Thank you!

  118. My mother-in-law requested a peach cobbler for Thanksgiving but she wanted a crispy crust. I ran a search and came across yours and it was a hit. I will definitely be asked to make this over and over!

  119. bridgit

    I just made a “winter” version: home canned peaches (unsweetened, mostly drained), we were out of lemon, so 1/2 tsp balsamic. A little orange zest & cinnamon in the topping. This was for breakfast, so I used all white whole wheat flour, 3/4 c. (maybe a little less) sugar in the batter, and 1/4 c on top w/ only 1/3 cup water (I was afraid it would be too soggy without more sugar to absorb the water). We served it with plain yogurt and it was delicious, and sweet enough that my daughter asked me to use less sugar next time! Thanks for the great recipe (ell, the structure anyway).

  120. Heather

    For those wondering if you should thaw frozen fruit first, the answer, from my experience, is a solid YES! I had to drain mine halfway through it was so watery. That’ll teach me for being lazy…!

  121. Julia

    This was my go-to recipe last summer; I made it 15 times, I was so in love with it! Now with the birth of my son, I’ve had to go gluten-free because of his sensitivity to it… Is there any way this recipe could be modified to use gluten-free flour or almond meal? OR can you suggest a wonderfully summery fruit dessert sans gluten for me to bring to every picnic and BBQ I attend? Thank you for your wonderful recipes!!!

    1. Cathy

      A previous comment on August 30, 2015 from Val stated, “I made a few adjustments and prepared GLUTEN FREE! It was AMAZING!! Definitely a new family favorite! Soooooo YUMMY!”

  122. CoolBeans

    First, I must say, I am not a peach person. But my dear husband is, so when we were at the Farmer’s Market yesterday, we bought some amazingly perfect yellow ones. We were having friends over to dinner tonight, so I said, ” I will make a peach pie.” “No,” said dear husband, “peach pies are gluey.” So I looked online and found Deb’s Smitten Kitchen crispy peach cobbler and decided to make it. OMG. The Bomb. We all went a little nuts over it. Not at all gluey! Delightfully peachy (if I do say so myself). Refreshing and summery and not too sweet. Make this and be happy.

  123. Olivia

    Hi Deb, I’m hoping to make this for a picnic and I’m wondering if the topping will stay crispy if I make it a day ahead of time? Would it be really underwhelming if the topping gets soft? How would you recommend covering it overnight?
    Thanks!

    1. deb

      I cannot remember how crispy it keeps in the fridge but I’m not, honestly, confident it was very well. Anything sitting on a damp fruit filling is going to eventually get soft, this topping, being thinnish, will likely do it sooner than a pie crust or traditional dumpling topping. To stave it off, I might keep it at room temperature uncovered. Overnight, it should be fine. (A lot of people keep pie at room temperature, so I see no reason this can’t be too.)

    2. I made this lovely peachy goodness. I split it into two dishes and we had one leftover. It kept very well in the fridge–we were pleasantly surprised how crispy the top stayed, even after reheating a serving in the microwave. It is now going into the “must make again ASAP” list.

    1. deb

      The search results for galettes (one L) is here: https://smittenkitchen.com/?s=galette However, I agree that the new search is less intuitive. Google search “guesses” when something is misspelled and this does not. The benefit of this new search is that we could make the results look nicer, but we might have to switch back if it’s just not as good. Hope you find what you’re looking for.

    1. deb

      My theory is that as people have been making cakes long before there were electric mixers, anything we use a machine for can be done by hand. But you’ll really want to whisk vigorously here to approximate the volume a few minutes at high speed will make easy work of. (You can look at the batter pictures above to get an idea of how you’ll want it to look.)

  124. I was just confused while making the recipe, on how much to add of sugar to the topping once the batter is spread on top? I used the amount for the batter that you recommended of 1 cup plus 2 tab. So, wasn’t sure if I was to add 1/2 more of sugar to the topping once spread out? Thank you

  125. CRM

    I made half of the recipe (adding a dash of cinnamon to the peaches and a dash of vanilla to the batter). Flavor was great, but while top was crisp, the rest of the batter turned out to be gooey still after 70 minutes plus a long rest (the batter wasn’t thicker than 0.5″ and it passed the toothpick test several times when I removed it from the oven). I made the half recipe in an oval 11x9x3″ baking dish. I think next time I will spread the half recipe out in two pie plates, thinking that the thinness will bake the batter better. Perhaps slightly less water too. Again, still very delicious, but might need longer cooking times. Great recipr, just needs a few tweaks. :-)

  126. Christine

    This was absolutely delicious! I have made it twice in the past week it was so good. It got rave reviews all around, and will now be my go-to peach dessert. I served it with chilled unsweetened whipped cream and thought it was perfect. Thanks for another amazing recipe Deb!

    1. Christine

      (I cooked it in a 9×13 pan for 70 minutes and let it firm up for a couple of hours before serving. It was perfect.)

  127. LauraG

    This was delicious. It reminded me of your strawberry summer cake but with the fruit and batter quantities reversed. I made it with mangoes which started out very soft and turned into a delicious mango-sauce consistency. I think with less ripe mangoes it be more like the original, but still not be as picture-perfect as the peaches, which have the peel to help them keep their shape.

  128. Seriously one of the best peach cobblers I’ve ever tasted. The top was crispy and paired perfectly with the baked consistency of the peaches!
    I opted to make it gluten free, using GF flour rather than AP, and replaced the butter with coconut oil. Used a mixture of yellow and white peaches. Cobbler’s filling was the perfect consistency.
    Agree with Deb – no need to use the full 2 cups of sugar (the 1.5 cups was good, but IMO even less would be OK since the peaches are so sweet).

    Deb, thank you for this recipe!!! Can’t wait to make it again and again!!