Monday, October 28, 2013

potato and broccolini frittata

potato and broccolini frittata with parmesan

I don’t mean to undersell this, but this is just a frittata. It’s not going to help decimate your weekend’s apple haul, it’s not to going to solve the whole homemade-pizza-on-your-schedule crisis, it’s not a cake you’ve been missing out on since 1983, which was 30 years ago, ow. No, it doesn’t have higher powers or reinvent grilled cheese, it’s not even the life-changing soup stock I’ve been meaning to tell you about for two years now (next week?) and I was about to say that it didn’t make the unconquerable in the kitchen conquerable, except that might not be true. This, in fact, did exactly that last Monday night, when someone told me about the recipe that morning and we had it on the table by dinnertime, no small feat some Mondays.

parmesan, onion, olive oil, potatoes, eggs, broccolini
halved lengths of broccolini

I realize that there’s a woeful dearth of frittata recipes on this site and while I’d like to tell you that I have an solid reason for neglecting the dinner omelet on this site such as not being very into eggs or vegetarian dinners or things that sound like breakfast-for-dinner, you’d know it was all lies. The truth is far less glamorous: prior to recently, the kid had almost zero interest in eggs, and while I may claim on paper to be the kind of parent who believes that it’s parents’ jobs to put out a healthy, nutritious meals three times a day, and then sign off, leaving it the matter of whether or not it gets eaten up to the offspring, I still do my fair share of, say, tilting the scales in dinner’s favor. That generally means that we eat a whole lot more kid-approved sweet potatoes, broccoli and rice than we might were we child-free, and also means we attempt to not build entire meals around things that the child outright loathes, such as eggs. But recently, there have been glimmerings of change in the air — eggs have been ingested willingly, whoa — and I got so excited that I set out to fill the site’s (but mostly our belly’s) frittata void.

make art from red onion slices

quartered baby gold potatoes
let the potatoes absorb some stock

… Well, cough, there was more for us. It’s quite a shame, because this was a really great dinner frittata, heavy on the vegetables but with enough golden potatoes and cheese that it doesn’t feel overly abstemious. The cheese isn’t just baked inside, but broiled on top, giving the lid of the frittata a frico-like effect, a thin crunch of broiled cheese before you bite into all of the greens and potatoes below, and it’s the kind of thing that doesn’t require a whole lot of advance planning to make for dinner. I mean, thank goodness.

soften the vegetables in the pan
eight eggs
half-cooked on the stove
potato and broccolini frittata with parmesan
potato and broccolini frittata with parmesan

One year ago: Butternut Squash Salad with Farro and Pepitas and Roasted Pear and Chocolate Chunk Scones
Two years ago: Baked Pumpkin and Sour Cream Puddings
Three years ago: Spiced Applesauce Cake
Four years ago: Cauliflower with Almonds, Raisins and Capers and Silky, Decadent Old-School Chocolate Mousse
Five years ago: Meatballs and Spaghetti, Molly’s Apple Tarte Tatin and Cranberry-Walnut Chicken Salad and Pumpkin Swirl Brownies
Six years ago: GF Chocolate Financiers and Pumpkin Butter, Pepita Granola
Seven years ago: Spinach Quiche and Pumpkin Muffins

Potato and Broccolini Frittata
Adapted, barely, from Easy Vegetarian One-Pot Meals via Leite’s Culinaria

Even if I know the thinner ones are more traditional, I like a frittata, especially a dinner version, to have a little bulk and this perfectly fit the bill, and leftover slices make a pretty great sandwich filling the next day, something I saw frequently in Rome. The recipe calls for broccolini, a variety of broccoli with thinner, longer stalks and smaller florets that keeps a dark rich green color after it is cooked. (aka Baby Broccoli, Broccolette; read more here.) However, I think any number of green vegetables would work here, either standard broccoli florets or sauteed kale, etc. What I wouldn’t skimp on is the parmesan. I know there’s a lot, in fact, if you must, skip the half the goes inside the frittata, but don’t skip the broiled part. That’s the salty/crunchy/frico finish and Monday night dinners would be so much more dull without it.

8 to 10 small waxy potatoes (about 1 ounce each), scrubbed and quartered
1 cup vegetable or another broth; just use salted water if you don’t have it around
1/4 cup olive oil
8 ounces (usually 1 bundle) broccolini, trimmed and halved lengthwise or chopped into 1-inch pieces
1 small red or white onion, thinly sliced
8 large eggs
1 cup (about 3 to 3 1/2 ouncesgrated Parmesan cheese
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Place the potatoes and broth in a large, ovenproof frying pan, ideally one that is 12 inches. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes, turning the potatoes often, until almost all of the stock has been absorbed and the potatoes are tender.

Add olive oil, broccolini and onion to the potatoes in the frying pan and cook over medium heat for 1 minute, turning frequently, just to get everything coated with oil, Then, reduce the heat to medium-low and cover the pan, cooking for 3 to 4 more minutes, or until the broccolini has become mostly tender.

Heat your broiler.

Beat eggs with half the parmesan, salt and pepper, and pour it over the vegetables in the frying pan. Cover and cook over medium (or medium-low, if yours seems to be browning too quickly) until the eggs are mostly, set. Sprinkle remaining parmesan over frittata and run the whole pan under the broiler, until the top is bronzed and the eggs are just set throughout, approximately 5 minutes, but this could vary due to how robust your broiler is (mine is terrible; it took longer).

Let cool slightly before slicing into wedges or squares.


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