twinkie bundt Recipes

twinkie bundt

As one does, I first spied a Twinkie Bundt on Pinterest a few weeks ago and immediately became consumed with making my own primarily because it’s spectacularly fun to say and also call someone, maybe or maybe not as a compliment. [As you can infer, we really like to flex our maturity at the Smitten Kitchen.] The recipe turned out to hail from the talented food blogger and cookbook author Shauna Sever‘s book, Pure Vanilla, but as I am stubborn, I wanted to go in my own direction with it as I have a buttermilk bundt I’m rather fond of and a simple marshmallow frosting that we could use instead of the jarred marshmallow filling suggested.


what you'll need
very yellow cake

If only things were this simple! My first step was to find a Twinkie, yes, the snack cake with a reputation for having an indefinite shelf life and I’ve decided that economists need to start something of a Twinkie Index, which measures how fancy your neighborhood has gotten and how hopeless your chances are of ever buying real estate by the presence or absence of this one-time snack aisle staple. I couldn’t find a one, i.e. we are doomed. I went to four bodegas, two drugstores (because in America you buy your candy at pharmacies!) and two grocery stores and found nada. I had to have one ported in from a different part of the city and did you know they contain beef tallow? I digress, I promise this isn’t going to be one of those sanctimonious rants about how gross packaged food is; this isn’t that kind of website and if eating a Twinkie once a decade makes you happy, so be it. This was more of a reminder that some labels are better not read.

thick batter
from the oven
scooping it out
scooped
making the marshmallow filling
ready to fill
all filled

So, Twinkie “investigated” and disposed of (or not; I admit nothing/regret everything) I concluded that my plans were on the right path and from there, everything went south. I could not get the filling as thick as I wanted it. Each time I sliced into the cake, loose marshmallow would spill out — yuck, right? Apparently, not. Apparently, I am much more bothered by this than anyone else that tried it or spied a photo of it on Instagram last night and so I’m going to do something I almost never do; I’m going to publish a recipe with a warning: this will not be exactly like a Twinkie! Arguably, this is the whole point and for the best, but should this bother you (don’t worry, you’re among friends), I’m going to include a few directions you might go in instead/paths I might have gone down if the chaos of real life right now didn’t force me to collect my chips and move onto other responsibilities. [Just kidding, we know all I really do all day is devour this bundle of frosting and light.]

twinkie bundt
twinkie bundt

One year ago: Cauliflower Cheese
Two years ago: Apple Slab Pie
Three years ago: Butternut Squash Salad with Farro and Pepitas
Four years ago: Pear Cranberry and Gingersnap Crumble
Five years ago: Spiced Applesauce Cake
Six years ago: Cauliflower with Almonds, Capers and Raisins
Seven years ago: Molly’s Apple Tarte Tatin and Cranberry Walnut Chicken Salad
Eight years ago: Pumpkin Butter and Pepita Granola
Nine years ago: Spinach Quiche

And for the other side of the world:
Six Months Ago: Potato Scallion and Kale Cakes
1.5 Years Ago: Avocado Cup Salads, Two Ways
2.5 Years Ago: Ramp Pizza
3.5 Years Ago: Classic Ice Cream Sandwiches
4.5 Years Ago: Crispy Potato Roast

Twinkie Bundt
Inspired by, but not the recipe from, Pure Vanilla

Cake
1 cup (225 grams) unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 3/4 cups (350 grams) granulated sugar
2 large eggs
2 large yolks (save the 2 whites for filling, below)
1 teaspoon (5 ml) vanilla extract
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon fine sea salt or table salt
2 1/2 cups (315 grams) all-purpose flour
1 cup (235 ml) buttermilk

Filling*
2 large egg whites
2/3 cup (135 grams) granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 teaspoon (5 ml) vanilla extract

Heat your oven to 350°F. Generously grease a 10-cup Bundt pan, either with butter or a nonstick spray; I like to use a butter-flour spray and go over the pan twice. Bundts are sticky! Fortuntely, this cake is not.

In a large bowl, cream butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs, one at a time, scraping down bowl between each, and then yolks. Add vanilla. Sprinkle batter with salt and baking powder and mix briefly to combine. Add about 1/3 of flour, mix to combine, then half of buttermilk, mixing again just to combine, repeating with next 1/3 of flour, remaining buttermilk then remaining flour.

Dollop batter into prepared pan and spread so that the top is smooth. Bake in heated oven for 40 to 45 minutes, or until toothpick inserted into cake comes out batter-free. Let cool in pan on wire rack for 10 minutes, then invert onto rack and let cool absolutely completely. You can hasten this along in the fridge; it will take about 45 minutes.

When cake is completely and totally cool, invert it again. If your cake had domed quite a bit in the oven, you can use a serrated knife to level it a little. Then, using a melon baller (my first choice), small spoon or paring knife, scoop out several mounds of cake through the underside, being sure not to cut through top or sides of cake. If using a traditional bundt shape (as I show), I used the larger bloops in the pattern (there are 8) for mine. What happens to the cake bellies you scoop out is between you and your gods.

Combine egg whites, sugar and cream of tartar in a heatproof bowl and place this over a pot of gently simmering water. Whisk constantly until sugar dissolves and whites are lukewarm to touch, about 3 minutes. Remove bowl from simmering water and use an electric mixer to beat with a whisk attachment on low speed, gradually increasing to high, until stiff, glossy peaks form, about 4 to 7 minutes. Add vanilla and mix to combine.

Scoop filling into a large piping bag fitted with a large, round tip or plastic bag with the corner cut off and fill the indentations of the cake. Center your cake platter over the cake and invert your filled cake back onto it. If desired, dust lightly with powdered sugar before serving.

This cake keeps at room temperature for up to 3 days. I keep mine under a cake dome.

* A few ways to approach the filling:

  • Make the recipe as above. The filling will be a bit soft, but very marshmallow-like. Plus, I’ve engineered the cake to give you the spare egg whites you’ll need.
  • Go in a different path. The next two things I’d have auditioned as fillings are Swiss Meringue Buttercream, which I know to be fairly stiff (I’d halve the 4 egg white-level frosting, and see if I could get away with just 8 tablespoons butter) or, as suggested by a clever commenter on Instagram, ABC Kitchen via Martha Stewart’s Marshmallow Frosting which is set with gelatin, which is, I think, exactly what this cake would need as you could keep the great marshmallow frosting flavor but not the softness.
  • Get real and just buy a jar of marshmallow fluff. Seriously, Sever knew what she was talking about. In her recipe, you beat a 7.5-ounce jar with a 1/2 cup softened butter and 1 teaspoon vanilla and I believe many headaches can be avoided this way. Also: yum.

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149 comments on twinkie bundt

  1. Growing up as a kosher kid, Twinkies were off limits because of the beef tallow, as were Oreos for the same reason. I swear there was a moment about 20 years ago where they removed the tallow and made the treat kosher. But I did notice last year that beef tallow had been added back. Luckily for us, they removed it from Oreos and kept it out. (Yes, we were a Hydrox family. I guess those were taken off the market a few years back only to be reintroduced last month.)

  2. Jane M

    HOLY MOLY – I just had to pick myself up off the floor as these pictures made me FAINT! THIS.IS.BY.FAR.THE.GREATEST.CAKE.TO.DATE.YOU.HAVE.BAKED! My hips and thighs THANK YOU!

  3. Jenny

    “I’ve engineered the cake to give you the spare egg whites you’ll need.”

    BRILLIANT! A recipe that calls for separating eggs, but doesn’t launch you into the (delicious, but time-consuming) cycle of “now I have extra egg yolks/whites… how can I use them up?”

  4. Lyra

    I have to wonder if it would be possible to just bury large storebought marshmallows in the batter, and make sure the marshmallows are fully covered by batter before baking, to eliminate the post-bake scoop and fill… I’m sure my office won’t mind being guinea pigs.

  5. Liz F

    I noticed your bag of buttermilk powder, and wanted to know your thoughts on it. Is it a good substitute? A pantry staple?

    I LOVE your raspberry buttermilk cake, it’s my go-to use of leftover buttermilk. Will powdered buttermilk mean I get this cake in m life more often?? How long does the powder last?

  6. emma

    well shoot, i’m just excited to learn about the existence of BUTTERMILK POWDER. i live overseas and the store that used to carry it stopped a year ago. i know what i’ll be picking up on my next trip stateside.

  7. Tabtiha W

    Ok I am very VERY excited about this. Twinkies are everywhere in Toronto. I am wondering if a bit of gelatin would help firm it up a bit without messing with the taste too much? There is gelatin in actual marshmallows. Maybe I will give it a shot this weekend.

  8. Jessica

    Is this the right recipe for the buttermilk bundt you favor even without the filling? I found the triple berry bundt on your site but not a plain one and I’m thinking it would be nice with chocolate chips, cause um, what isn’t?

  9. Anne

    This is amazing! What about using the marshmallow topping from the s’more pie (which is more similar to an actual marshmallow recipe) rather than the one here?

  10. CL

    So funny – I had the Twinkie bundt recipe from Sweetapolita bookmarked to make today, then I realized I didn’t have a bundt pan. And then your review for this other recipe came in and I wasn’t so pumped about it.

    So I’m making Mynameisyeh.com’s basil marscapone buttercream frosted chocolate cake instead. Perhaps I’ll get a bundt pan tomorrow and make the twinkie cake again (with the marshmallow fluff of course.)

  11. deb

    Buttermilk powder! — So, this is my first time buying and using it, hence, I am a non-expert. I thought it was maybe some unnatural, janky ingredient and not my thing, but then 1) I realized that carton buttermilk is definitely not natural nor is it true buttermilk; I mean, it works fine in recipes but why trouble myself to buy it all the time (although, I still will sometimes), and 2) Bob’s Red Mill, a brand I love, makes buttermilk powder, and they don’t make garbage. So, I bought some and you can mix it with water to make buttermilk, but I found it just as easy to add the powder with the dry ingredients and water as the wet. And here’s the thing: it tastes AMAZING. I shouldn’t have stuck my finger in there, but I did and it’s so buttery and lightly tangy (I’d say way less tangy than carton stuff), it reminds me of the sour cream (or sour cream and onion) dust on potato chips, so you know where I’m going next with this. I am also convinced that the cake is just more buttery and richly flavored. It makes the batter taste unbelievable. Don’t find out; nothing good comes of it.

    This buttermilk bundt recipe — This has been my favorite, or I thought it was, but now I’m less certain. The flavor is excellent and it (knock on wood) doesn’t stick to a greased pan. But I overbaked it slightly so this might be why I like it slightly less than I thought.

  12. nzle

    I hope none of my dinner guests are reading this, but I’ve been looking for a dessert for the dinner party of all-black foods I’m planning for Halloween. Now I’m thinking that this cake (augmented with a tablespoon or so of food-grade, flavorless Japanese activated charcoal to turn it pitch-black) with a spoooooooky ghostly white filling is going to take the, uh, cake!

  13. Susan

    What a fun cake idea! Seven minute frosting is a great idea for the filling.

    I was not a fan of Twinkies alone (no icing!) and always went for the chocolate cupcakes with that squiggle of white or the snowballs (especially the pink ones) covered in coconut, instead. I was known, on the rare occasion I was offered a Twinkie, to stick my finger in the filling to scoop it out to eat it…and lived to tell of my offense! Later on, I found that Twinkies made a slightly more acceptable substitute for those shortcake cups, produced by the same company, to bury under sweetened strawberries, with added whipped cream, and lived to tell of that, too!

    Molly…Hydrox was my favorite of the chocolate filled cookies that existed. I loved the more sugary, slightly gritty filling. I did not like Oreos because I thought the filling was kind of waxy and coated the inside of the mouth in a weird way instead of finally dissolving, like Hydrox filling would. Glad to know they are back. I have to admit, though, I am kind of liking those new thin Oreos.

  14. Gale

    So I’m surprised by two things. 1) Given their shelf life that Twinkie’s would contain beef tallow over partially hydrogenated vegetable oil. And 2) that you would look askance at beef tallow. It’s a much more natural ingredient than shortening, and flavorless when made correctly. All of that aside, I can’t wait to try this. Thanks for posting.

  15. Randi

    I’m actually not sure I’ve ever even eaten a Twinkie but this looks delish! Too bad bundts feed about 67 people and we have only two, otherwise I’d jump on making this as soon as I got my hands on a bundt pan!

  16. I just made this tonight for a dinner party tomorrow and so far I’m thrilled with the results. I’ve only made the cake so far, going to cool it overnight and fill it in the morning but my house smells heavenly!

  17. SallyT

    I love Pure Vanilla. Her vanilla bean buttercream is my hands-down favorite.

    My book club may need me to make this cake next week…

  18. Julie

    I have a fantasy of following this exact recipe BUT making a caramel filling. Would this be so wrong? And if it is, do I want to be right?

  19. Question: if you cut the slices of prepared cake at the points, not the curve, wouldn’t you avoid hitting the marshmallow inside? Thus you would have 8 slices, all of which would look like regular ol’ delicious bundt cake, but when you go to eat it, surprise!!
    Also- perhaps using the buttermilk powder (instead of store-bought buttermilk) affected the flavor of your once-most-favorite bundt. Was this your first time using it? I love the idea of powdered though, as I would love to quit fooling myself into believing I’ll use that extra buttermilk in something only to find it weeks later, past due and toss it then. Promising to myself that next time I swear I will coordinate a menu where I use it all (never happens).

  20. Molly M

    I saw your “Twinkie” Bundt cake on Instagram and I thought it looked quite yummy with the filling spilling out like a marshmallowy waterfall. So glad you decided to go ahead and share the recipe with us. And thanks for the tip on the buttermilk powder; I ran right out and got a bag which should solve my chronic lack-of-buttermilk problem.

  21. Anne

    Ok so this cake looks amazing. I will defs make it but with a chocolate rather than vanilla bundt. I’m sure it won’t be a Twinkie then but I have never eaten one and given the description I don’t think I’m missing much ;)
    That said – and I don’t understand what I am missing – how are the insides covered? Or do they stay uncovered? If so, how do you flip the cake with the filling staying inside the little scooped out wholes? And do you have to then leave your bundt on the same plate the whole time? I’m insure of the logistics here… Please advise as it really does look delicious. Thanks!!!

  22. Lauren

    AAAck! Twinkie Bundt? My all time favorite snack has grown up! ( I was allergic to chocolate as a kid, so it was at least possible for me to “seem normal” with Twinkies and PayDay candy bars.) This looks great, and I will be attempting it when there is going to be someone around to help me eat it. That little “bundle of sweetness” you have there really “Takes the Cake”. Gorgeous! People PAY MONEY for that hair color, to say nothing of the brows!

  23. Megan

    So sad that you could buy Fluff here in Australia in the big supermarkets and poof not any more so so sad. Cake looks great and I am not a sweet eater. So am I correct in thinking that a Twinkie will survive the nuclear apocalypse?

  24. Kerry

    Deb, what do you think about using the frosting from the devil dog cake? My recollections as that it was pretty firm. Do you think it would work? Thanks!

  25. MaggieToo

    This is a big DITTO for the powdered buttermilk love. What a godsend! Been using it for years. Always believed that more buttermilk got thrown away than actually used, when that quart sits in your fridge for months after you use the one cup your recipe called for. And why don’t they just sell it in pints, like heavy cream?

    And this cake is the most delightfully trailer-trashy thing I’ve ever seen on Smitten Kitchen. Did you know you can make an ‘actual’ Twinkie cake by just pouring white cake batter over Twinkies arranged in a cake pan? I once did that using every crappy item made by Little Debbies and won first prize at a White Trash Potluck party.

  26. speaking of questionable packaged food ingredients, I was out at 2am in a city that was not NYC and the only food-y store open was 7 Eleven. As much as I wanted to indulge in my nostalgia tooth (for a childhood routine I didn’t actually have lol) I just couldn’t bring myself to buy their hot dogs or cheesy sausages or taquitos or loaded Doritos. I eat my fair share of Shake Shack and fried chicken and can be a pretty poor decision maker, but the 7 Eleven “food”…I can’t even…how is this legal???

  27. Cari

    So I too recently discovered buttermilk powder, and while looking for advice on how to use it, I read that the powdered version is not acidic enough to react with baking soda. It’s obviously not a problem in this recipe because it uses baking powder, but have you had to adjust other recipes when using the powder?

  28. Jo

    This cake is lovely. I have been using buttermilk powder for many years and use it all the time. So convenient! Once opened, it needs to be stored in the refrigerator to keep its nice fluffy powdery consistency. If left out, it becomes lumpy and chalky.

  29. Margy

    Will you marry me? I mean, I know you’re already married, and so far I’m female and straight, but this is how I feel after reading this post.

  30. Ahhhh Yes!! Ignorance is bliss. If I really like something I don’t want to know what’s in it. Good grief we all need a little bit of lightness and fun. This sounds wonderful and I love the ooey gooey of it. That’s a Twinkie!! I’ve heard they’ve put Twinkies in some of the age capsules for people hundreds of years from now will be able to enjoy. I’m sure they’ll taste just as fresh as the day they packaged them. The people will probably be pale and emaciated from lack of junk food and sugar. Won’t a twinkie be a boost for them???? Great recipe. I believe King Arthur has buttermilk powder on their website.

  31. Robin

    Oh wow! Smitten, you’ve done it again! I make the devil dog cake for my kids birthdays every year now but THIS!?! I cannot wait to try!

  32. Mrs. Fifi La Singe

    OH EMM GEE.

    When you’re painting plus packing up a big old yankee house because you’re moving plus downsizing …and then add to it, you’re old and limping around like Chester from Gunsmoke because you got a little crazy and fell off a ladder but still, craving your own baking, this might be the starting gate. Making the sacrifice and taking good care of one’s self means (in some instances) a nice fresh marshmallow filling would be the perfect start. FYI I have a whoopie pie recipe around here and I believe that filling suggests the doctored Fluff route but I’m kind of all in on the making it from scratch – if my back is willing to hold me up – and with this as a bribe – what back wouldn’t? From my chair this seems totally doable THIS WEEK! Do I need the poundage? a quiet no. Do I need the Twinkie cake? YES! – loudly – YES I DO! (fist pump)

  33. Kathleen

    hmm..Twinkie cake..I suppose one could make a chocolate cake and put white frosting or marshmallow fluff in the middle and call it a ding dong…another popular hostess snack
    Cute picture by the way..she sure is growing..should be a fun hallowe’en with both of them

  34. Liz

    I am glad someone here stuck up for tallow. It was wrongly demonized by the people who developed shortening to increase their market at the same time lard was demonized. Now lard is obviously not kosher, but tallow from a kosher steer should be kosher. it makes amazing pie crust, I render my own. If the animal grazes on fresh grass it can be yellow like butter and soft at room temperature. McDonald’s fries were doomed when they stopped using tallow and were not more healthful.

  35. Deb,

    Did you try piping a little less of the marshmallow filling and then replugging a portion of the cake back into the holes? Or using a smaller tip on your pastry bag, possibly a 1/2″ or less diameter and basically drilling smaller holes into the cake spaced closer together, using the tip and then applying gentle pressure until you sense that the cake is swelling a bit, sort of like using the same technique as when filling a cupcake?

  36. What a fun idea! I haven’t had a twinkie in years and frankly, I’m sure they’re not as good as I remember. Your bundt would be a better option. Also, I’m so gratified to know that I’m not the only one who makes things — that haven’t gone quite the way I’ve expected them to. Case in point, rugelach which has been a 3-day project. Arrgghh!!

  37. MaryM

    Am I the only odd duck who has an urge to prepare and eat (in secret, of course) a batch of the filling, alone? Being diabetic, of course I won’t, but it’s really nagging at me.

  38. Susan

    A-may-zing!!! I cannot wait to try this (and I shall this week, for the annual office Halloween bake off!). One thought–what would you think of the idea of marbling the bundt, and what would be the best way to do so? (I mean, my personal preference is always for buttermilk cake AS IS!! But I work with chocolate lovers . . . And I aim to please!)

  39. Jamie

    Thoughts on stabilizing the filling with some gelatin (a la regular marshmallows) to make a cleaner slice? It’s a fine line between stable and rubbery, but it would have great visual appeal.

  40. Korilean

    Deb, you couldn’t find a Twinkie (nor can you find the Hostess cupcakes or snowballs) because Hostess the company that made them here in Seatlle went out of business a year or so ago.

  41. JP

    Another word on buttermilk powder…when you add it to dry ingredients first, and then add water, it works very well. But if you mix it up per directions, it can be too thin and add too much liquid to your recipe. I have had a few disasters using buttermilk powder, but I do keep a large can of it and love the fact that it has an indefinite shelf life. I enjoy the taste of store bought buttermilk in a carton and if it was not so expensive, I would buy it more often. Buttermilk powder is a much better deal, but just be careful to add less, at first, if you make it up in liquid form.

  42. Sarah

    Wow. Never before have I looked at something you’ve done and said “ohmygoodnesswhybother” so very fast. But then again, I hate waste, fuss, and marshmallow. The real reason I’m commenting: my high school biology teacher was a food scientist on the twinkie project! Yes, she taught us not to eat them.

  43. anon

    This is precisely why I love your website: “I digress, I promise this isn’t going to be one of those sanctimonious rants about how gross packaged food is; this isn’t that kind of website and if eating a Twinkie once a decade makes you happy, so be it. This was more of a reminder that some labels are better not read.”

    Thank you for consistently writing and sharing reliable, mostly healthy recipes that are always a surprise and a pleasure–some quick, some healthy, some experimental, some indulgent, all a joy.

  44. I love how this cake looks so elegant and refined, and then when you slice it, it’s just a fun pop of marshmallow goodness! I love the combination of the tender buttermilk cake and the sticky, sweet marshmallow filling – I just know it’ll be addictive. Once again, you have me scrambling to my kitchen in an attempt to make one of your recipes! Lots of love Deb! XO

  45. Awfulknitter

    I’ve been resisting buying a bundt cake pan (I don’t bake often enough), and you’re not helping me fortify my willpower!

    If you wanted to keep the softness of the filling, why not do the marshmallow frosting but with less gelatin? BTW, that marshmallow frosting looks just like a regular marshmallow recipe. Which leads me on to thinking about all the different flavour combinations you could do. St Clements bundt cake? Orange cake and lemon marshmallows – I made lemon marshmallows and put a dab of citric acid in, and they were terribly moreish! Or how about chocolate bundt cake with raspberry marshmallow?

  46. This is excellent. Also, you’ve only just made me realise, even after I was a non-American living in America, how crazy it is that if you want candy somewhere that is not Target or the grocery store, you need to go to a Pharmacy – I always got Red Vines (they don’t melt) and bottled water for the beach at CVS!

  47. Laura

    With the stress of a new job and wedding planning (not to mention pre-wedding dieting), my baking habit has been on a long hiatus. BUT now that I’m back from my honeymoon, settled into my job, free to be whatever size I want AND it’s no longer sweltering in my apartment, baking season is back on. This is the perfect ridiculous kickoff recipe to re-christen my oven. Can’t wait to get started!

  48. Marcia

    That gorgeous red hair! That rosebud mouth! Nice work!!

    Oh yeah, the cake. That looks good, too. I was always more of a Hostess cupcake kid than a Twinkie kid, but this looks delicious.

  49. Mir

    I’ve been using buttermilk powder for years. I use Saco Cultured Buttermilk. It keeps in the fridge for ages and works quite nicely in baking and in bread recipes. This recipe is definitely one to try.

  50. Just the other day my 3rd grader spied Twinkies in the grocery story. Mom, she asked, and in her hazel eyes growing big and round with wonder, What are Twinkies?

    And I quickly whisked her away, into the adjacent produce aisle, telling her, Nevermind, Dear. Forget what you just saw.

    But now, Now! I can give this child what she knew intuitively was a sinfully delicious dessert and something she knew she needed to try. I can make this for her without the yucky stuff!

    Thank you!

  51. Debby

    Deb, I must be one of very few people who never cared much for Twinkies. I was a Hostess Cupcake freak instead. But, your receipe is great, and above all, I so appreciate the many photos of the steps to a receipe that you always include. And, thank you for admitting that the batter can’t be “poured” into the pan. Too many recipes with stiff batters make me wonder what I’m doing wrong. And most of all, thanks for keeping your readers up to date with Anna. She is too cute to be legal!

  52. Amy P

    Anna has red eyebrows!! She’s flippin adorable. I mean, I have a super cute 3 week old laying right beside me and I’m still cooing over stranger’s babies on the internet.
    Also – thanks for the tip on buttermilk powder. I’ve never really liked the taste of buttermilk, but I love sour cream so maybe this would be more up my alley. Plus the whole annoyance of having to buy a litre of buttermilk at a time – what is up with that?

  53. sharilyn unthank

    This looks delicious. Anna is so very cute and love the red hair. And the new email newsletter format is going to be great. As long as I get to see your recipes and your adorable children grow up, I am in.

  54. Stephanie

    How do you not eat your baby?!

    On the buttermilk–Kate’s Buttermilk is the best think ever. Actual buttermilk. Different taste, and soooooo good in baked goods.

  55. Sheila

    Perfect timing! My husband loves marshmallow…I’ll make this tonight for his birthday tomorrow, half with a chocolate ganache and half with shredded coconut for a Snowball…his favorite! Thanks so much….and maybe again with the charcoal for Halloween, I find myself fascinated at the thought…and people at work will love it! Hmm, a chocolate glaze, and then orange fondant?

  56. MomtoChris

    So excited about this recipe! My son has a mild egg white allergy-mainly if the egg whites are not cooked through. Otherwise, he can and should eat baked goods with eggs in them as long as the eggs are baked at 350 degrees for at least 15 minutes. Eating baked eggs will help decrease his sensitivity. I am concerned about the egg whites used in the filling. Would marshmallow fluff work just as well? Or, maybe some warmed, melted marshmallows?

  57. Following the buttermilk convo. I make a Swedish yogurt at home — filmjolk. I read it substitutes as buttermilk in Sweden and so I keep a few cups on hand for baking AND yogurt consumption. It is so incredibly awesome to have this ready to go! I highly recommend!!

  58. Nicki in SLC

    Just made this yesterday, and it was everything I ever dreamed it would be from the moment I saw your Instagram post. I amazingly successfully got the right “consistency” of marshmallow filling by adding a smidge more cream of tartar, and instead of 2/3 cup granulated sugar, I made it with 1/3 + 1/6 cup granulated sugar (I’m terrible at math-is that 1/2 cup?!) and 1/6 cup powdered sugar. I whipped/beat for a little longer than suggested as well (maybe 1 minute at most). Thanks for this recipe–it was a big hit!

  59. Cheryl

    I made this last night after it popped up in my Facebook feed and had to try it. Oddly, I don’t like twinkies but the flavor of this cake is amazing on its own, add the marshmallow creme and its a winner. I did have a couple of questions. How much cake did you hollow out? Did you go almost to the top of the cake? My creme was thicker but there were spots in the cake with no cream-I’m assuming that’s how its supposed to be? Any tips for getting the marshmallow into the piping bag? I made a total mess. I also did replace the cake after I piped the marshmallow.
    Will definitely make this again.

  60. deb

    A question about buttermilk powder for everyone else — My package from Bob’s Red Mill says it stores best in the fridge or freezer, which makes sense. But I’m nervous about the moisture of either; won’t it make the buttermilk clump? Right now, I still have it at room temperature so I need advice. :)

    MomtoChris — I’ve got alternative instructions for how to use Marshmallow Fluff instead at the end of the recipe.

    Beef tallow — Personally, I have no issues with it. I think many vegetarians would be surprised to learn that Twinkies are not. Then again, nobody was eating them for health purposes…

    If you don’t have a bundt pan — You could use a tube pan instead, or you can halve this in a loaf pan.

    Kerry — The frosting from the Devil Dog cake is the same style as this one.

    Anne — There are holes in the bottom. The filling doesn’t come out because it’s on a plate. Even if you switch plates, no more than a smear of frosting is left behind.

    Sarafina — Yes, I suppose you could cut between the filling holes for cleaner cuts. But I of course like the filling being seen.

  61. Elizabeth

    OMG I clicked backwards from the oven fries recipe to try to see a pic of your baby’s face and you didn’t disappoint! Congrats! I love her colors!

  62. My mom used to make a twinkie cake and it was always my favorite. I have looked for the recipe a few times but didn’t feel like I found the right one. I am definitely going to try this. Would be good for a birthday cake. Love the way you scoop the holes out for the filling, too! Thank you.

  63. Anne Field

    I made the Twinkie Bundt for my friend’s birthday today, and I used your Swiss Meringue Buttercream (per the recipe, no reductions in egg whites, etc.). I was going to share a photo on Instagram of how beautiful it turned out (Twinkies are beautiful!), but the cake was gone in minutes. It was a huge hit and everyone loved saying “Twinkie Bundt”. I will definitely make this again. Not only is it a delicious cake with a lovely moist crumb, but it made people smile and laugh and remember Twinkies, and it made the birthday girl very happy. Thanks for posting the photo on Instagram and then the recipe, Deb, even though you didn’t think the filling was perfect. The buttercream is darn close to perfect. It got raves. So do you!

  64. Late to this, but: what is this leftover buttermilk of which (so many of) you speak?

    I drink buttermilk by the glass, usually thinning it with water and adding a pinch of salt. This is, of course, the original lassi (without the mango prefix). American buttermilk is made differently from Indian, but the ingredients on the carton (from Trader Joe’s) are simply milk and cultures (bacteria), which makes it similar enough in my eyes.

    Also traditional is to add a pinch of cumin and sometimes cilantro or fresh ginger. Here is a version with mint that uses yogurt, but could easily use buttermilk. http://joythebaker.com/2013/03/mint-and-cumin-salted-lassi/

    Sweet lassis are fine, but savory lassis, or any savory cold drinks for that matter, are wonderful things as well.

  65. Lali

    I made this yesterday and here are my thoughts:
    Don’t overbake the cake. I waited for the top to get nice and brown, and it was a touch dry. So use the tester to ensure it comes out clean, and don’t worry about the color.
    I used the Martha Stewart marshmallow frosting recipe and it was good, but I’m not sure it was worth the extra effort with a candy thermometer and all.
    I love the taste combination, but made my cake holes too small, so the filling/cake ratio wasn’t high enough for my liking. I ended up spreading some frosting on the top and sides, but next time will focus on the holes (bigger! deeper!). The taste is fantastic, and I will make this again.
    PS Hubby made me SK mac and cheese for dinner last night. True love!

  66. Panya

    I’ve been using powdered buttermilk for about 14 years now! Ever since the remaining carton of buttermilk I’d bought for a recipe went bad and completely turned me off ever buying the “fresh” stuff again. [Since we’re lactose intolerant, we also keep regular powdered milk to use for cooking/baking because cartons of milk kept turning before we could use it all.] I always keep it in the back of the fridge, and I also add the powder with the dry ingredients and the water with the wet. It doesn’t really clump so much as ‘stick to itself’ a bit like corn starch does — which, duh, is clumping, but it’s not the same. ;-)

  67. Nia

    I’m baking the cake currently and was wondering what to do with the leftover egg whites. Then it occurred to me, you have a good 7 minute frosting that requires 3 of the 4 egg whites! I think it’s meant to be so!

  68. Merryl

    Having poured out more buttermilk than I ever actually used, lately I’ve been following directions I read somewhere and adding vinegar to regular milk (you can Google the proportions), allowing it to sit for 10 minutes or so and I can’t taste the difference in baked goods.

  69. Rachel

    Hey Deb! Just wanted to let you (and others) know how the recipe went. I halved the recipe and made two very minor changes: I used two whole eggs and made “buttermilk” from heavy cream and white vinegar. The cake took about 40 minutes to bake. As you said above, it definitely domed, but was totally fine! I used the fluff/butter/vanilla filling and it turned out really well – a little stiff at first, but softened after it sat out for around 10 minutes. Everything worked out beautifully, was easy to make, and tasted delicious! I would also totally eat this cake with berries and cream! Thanks for another amazing recipe, Deb!

  70. I made this over Thanksgiving and it was a hit. Fun to make as well. My only critique is that it was overly sweet, especially the cake. I felt the amount of sugar overpowered the buttermilk. I’m planning to make a mini bundt (1/2 recipe) version this weekend and will decrease the sugar by a third. I’ll let you know how it turns out!

  71. PeachWeb (Karen)

    I love it! Great idea! Though, marshmallow and frostings would be far too sweet of a filling, at least for my taste buds. When one says “Twinkie”, the most important factor, I think, is the light, airy filling. Try using this easy, delicious whipped cream / Jello instant pudding filling recipe: http://www.sprinkledwithjules.com/home/2014/3/26/easy-bavarian-cream-filling
    I love it so much and I have used all the Jello flavors (mostly for cream puffs—which my friends now beg me to make). It’s not my recipe, I stumbled upon it some time ago… and am SO GLAD I did!
    Make an Adult filling, just substitute alcohol for the extra milk the recipe calls for to smooth (and thin) the cream at the end (I use a ½ cup liquid for cream puff filling, though recipe only calls for a couple of tablespoons… make it, you’ll see you can add more liquid). Think Bailey’s or Creme De Mint with Vanilla or White Chocolate, Bourbon with Butterscotch (in a rich chocolate Bundt…mmmm), Brandy with Chocolate, Bacardi Coconut Rum is great with any of the flavors–except Pistachio or Lemon, though Lemon can pair with most liquors and if you look up Pistachio and spirits, you will find a ton of pairings (it’s trendy right now). You get the idea. Then imagine all the different flavor versions of this Bundt cake you could bake… well, that makes this duo so versatile we could all bake one and wind up with different combinations.
    Happy baking, everyone!

  72. deb

    Becky — Actually, now that you mentioned it, I see a couple people did. I wonder why I rejected it; I can’t think of a reason right now except for figuring out which part to set with it, as there’s no liquid (water/milk/cream) added.

  73. Dora

    I finally made this and it was awesome. Though a warning: When I added my good bourbon vanilla to the filling it tasted way too boozy, so I tossed it and made a second, vanilla-less batch. Everyone loved!

  74. Mary

    You asked whether the buttermilk powder would clump in the fridge/freezer. I’ve used it for many years, storing the container inside a ziploc bag in the fridge, and yes, I do find that the powder does clump eventually. If you use it regularly it shouldn’t really be a problem.

  75. Trish

    I was intrigued by the recipe but not really a Twinkie fan; wondering if you have tweaks to turn this into a Ding-Dong recipe?

  76. Golda

    Deb, this cake is amazing! I made it (with the marshmallow fluff shortcut) and loved it. I was wondering if it would make a good layer cake – seems like about the right volume for two 9-inch layers? I’m trying to make a chocodile layer cake and I’m hoping this will work!

    PS: Love the new site design!

  77. Morgan

    I made this for a friend’s birthday and it’s just so good! I had made it before (for a work thing) and it came out beautifully that time as well. This is a nice, pull it out when you need to bake a cake, cake. This time, though, I seem to have had a lot more marshmallowy frosting than last time, or maybe my filling holes were small, so I just put the remaining 1/2 cup or so on the top, like a beautiful drizzle?

    Also, I didn’t have buttermilk, but I didn’t stress either and just used whole milk. The cake didn’t self-destruct and is still as delicious as the previous time!

  78. Amalia

    I will admit I haven’t had a Twinkie in probably at least a decade but that’s because they taste like crap now. Back in the the 80’s, the creamy center was creamy not marshmallowy. This is not a Twinkie cake.

  79. Libby

    I swear this recipe used to have at least a sentence on the buttermilk powder(?)! I looked for it everywhere, bought it off amazon, gave it away when I moved, looked everywhere again and randomly found it CHEAPER than on Amazon (I didn’t even know this could happen;-). Now I’m revisiting this recipe and am all chin scratch quizzical face emoji.

  80. jeanvram

    Though I don’t have a real sweet tooth (reserve only for cheesecakes), I’ll definitely will make 2 of this for the next family gathering, Thanksgiving, the other one for a family friend who loves S’mores and will be drizzled with chocolate ganache as topping to mimic S’mores.
    Anyway, what is the name brand of your bundt pan. I have the orginal design but I like this one with smaller ridges in between for a kid serving.

      1. jeanvram

        Started search this AM for that sturdy bundt pan with handle, akin to Nordic Ware’s mini bundt pan, 6 forms heavy cast aluminum. BTW, your Twinkie innovation was genius, should include it on next cookbook or have you by now. Thanks.

  81. Marcia

    Haven’t read all the comments so I apologize if this has been mentioned, but here’s a trick I use whenever baking in any of my pans:
    After doing the butter/flour (or equivalent spray), put your pan in the refrigerator or freezer for 10 min or so.
    I live at 7000′ and have had dreadful problems with batters sticking to pans, but this technique works like a charm.
    Thanks for all your “twinkie-bundt” wonderfulness, Deb!

  82. connie

    Wow!! Looks amazing :) I have to say, though, that the marshmallow filling sounds for all the world like 7 Minute Icing. It probably would have come out thicker if you’d have kept it over the pot and whipped it for the 7. My Mother made this for her coconut cakes. I’ll have to try this cake for sure. Maybe even trim the cake bellies and plug the holes a bit (and frost the wee bellies with some icing!) No one would ever know…

  83. MARSHA

    Thanks Deb for letting me off the hook on the marshmellow fluff-I just happened to have bought a jar and after reading your recipe, thinking, well maybe someday, then I saw you sanctioned the jar stuff. I let out a YAY! I won’t anger the gods if I fake it! So I’m making it tomorrow!

  84. Your failure to find Twinkies cracked me up! Once when I was sick, it took me a combo of 4 corner stores/fancy grocery stores to find simple white bread. It was equal parts hilarious and pathetic. I chalked it up to living in San Francisco!

  85. Emma

    I made this with a homemade fluff recipe from the kitchn which holds up well.
    Question: how did you get your marshmallow to be so evenly distributed? I tunneled mine in between the scoops in the bottom but that’s not what I understood from the instructions. Any tips?
    Thanks!

  86. I liked it, but thought the bundt cake was sort of overly rich/sweet for my tastes. The people I served it to, however, loved it beyond all reason and have requested I make another one soon. I used the fluff recipe from Sever and found the process of filling the cake very easy. Will maybe try her cake recipe next time.