Recipes

perfect vegetable lasagna

Here is a theory: There are two types of picky people, those that are totally fine just never experiencing a life with, I don’t know, tomatoes or bananas or pickles or raisins (yes, I’ve read your comments — all of them) and then there is the kind that finds their epicurean limitations to constrict like an uncomfortable jacket they’d love to shed if they could figure out how. I, a lifelong Picky Person, am the latter. Over the years creating and sharing recipes for this site, I’ve embraced so many things I once thought I didn’t like [insert basically half the ingredients in anything here, ever], but it turned out I just didn’t like the way they were usually made.

And now the time has come for me to get over my lasagna issues. What are you saying? you might ask. There are two lasagna recipes in the archives. You love them both! And it’s true. What I have struggled with is what I’d call The Usual Vegetable Lasagna. I want something as bubbling, bronzed, and brick-like as a classic lasagna should be, but I needed to fix a few things along the way.


– Most vegetable lasagna recipes are meat lasagnas with a footnote that you can just leave the meat out. But I wanted one that celebrated the presence of vegetables, a lot of them. And I wanted us to be able to choose our own vegetable adventure based on what we could get and what we like. Here, I use 4 diced cups of mushrooms, onions, and fennel, plus spinach. In the summer it might be zucchini and eggplant. You pick what you like with sauce, cheese, and pasta.

what you'll needonion and fennelmushroomsadd greenstomato pastea rich tomato sauce

– I know it’s just me, but I find no-boil lasagna noodles too thin and unacceptably bereft of ruffly edges. But I also hate boiling lasagna noodles, which. as we all know, stick to everything and also themselves and you spend a good 15 minutes peeling and tearing them to get them spread in a pan and wondering why you didn’t just make baked ziti, which would never do you like this. I don’t know why it took me so long to just use the lasagna noodles I like and soak them in hot tap water for 10 minutes and letting the rest happen in the oven, but I finally did and will never make lasagna from dried noodles another way again.

– I’ve never liked the texture of baked ricotta. Fresh ricotta is pure bliss, of course, but it gets so grainy and dry when baked with sauce and noodles, I was happy to use a smooth, rich bechamel instead. (Both previous lasagnas are bechamel lasagnas.) But here I experimented with adding some heavy cream to ricotta to keep it from baking up dry and really liked the effect. You may not need or want it here, but if the above mimics your feelings about lasagna, you’re in for a treat.

add the vegetableslayer it upfive layers highoops

– My last quibble with many lasagna recipes is the height. Quite often, hearty lasagna recipes call for less than a pound of noodles, building 4, instead of 5, layers, which settle into a nice but kind of squat lasagna. I’d prefer a full five tiers — a beautiful thing to behold, especially when the top layer is crackly with bronzed melted cheese over a thin slick of garlicky tomato sauce. Well, I learned why. The former fits nicely in a standard 9×13-inch baking dish with 2.5-inch sides. The latter appears to and then your oven floor tells you a different story. So, this is where the story was supposed to end: me muttering under my breath about the burning smell, chalking the lasagna up to a failure. But, I mean, it’s not like it was going into the trash. I waited about 45 minutes to cut into it, which is a great thing to do if you don’t like burning your mouth of food; it also gives the lasagna time to set up. Instead of finding a sloshy mess inside, I found nirvana: no extra liquid, no sog, just a perfectly set up, sky-high lasagna masterpiece. We need this. We want this. We should not compromise. Bake it over a tray to catch drips and you won’t have to, either.

perfect vegetable lasagna

Note: You can watch an Instagram demo of this recipe here.

Previously

Six months ago: Ultimate Zucchini Bread and Black Pepper Tofu and Eggplant
One year ago: Bodega-Style Egg and Cheese Sandwich and Chocolate Puddle Cakes
Two years ago: Slow-Roasted Sweet Potatoes and Korean-Braised Short Ribs
Three years ago: Small-Batch Tiramisu
Four years ago: Miso Black Sesame Caramel Corn and Hot and Sour Soup
Five years ago: Oven-Braised Beef with Tomatoes and Garlic and Pecan Sticky Buns
Six years ago: Chocolate Hazelnut Linzer Hearts and Chocolate Peanut Butter Cheesecake
Seven years ago: Italian Stuffed Cabbage
Eight years ago: Lasagna Bolognese
Nine years ago: Blood Orange Olive Oil Cake
Ten years ago: Best Cocoa Brownies and Chana Masala
Eleven years ago: Chocolate Whiskey and Beer Cupcakes and Crispy Black Bean Tacos with Feta and Slaw
Twelve years ago: Seven-Yolk Pasta Dough and Best Chocolate Pudding
Thirteen years ago: For Beaming, Bewitching Breads

Perfect Vegetable Lasagna

  • Servings: 8 to 12
  • Source: Smitten Kitchen
  • Print

I consider this at its core a classic red sauce and ricotta lasagna recipe, the kind you make for friends and family, the kind you make two of at once so you can freeze the other. If you like your lasagna on the very cheesy side (this is cheesy, but not heavily cheesy), you might increase the mozzarella to 1 1/2 pounds. I buy mozzarella that’s been packaged tightly in plastic, not the kind in water, for baked pastas. For the 4 cups of diced vegetables, use what you can get or what you love. I got about 2 cups from 8 ounces of sliced mushrooms (that I further diced) and 2 cups diced fennel (from a medium bulb). I’d definitely use peppers, zucchini, eggplant, or even broccoli here too.

    Vegetables and sauce
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced small
  • 4 cups small-diced (about 1/2-inch pieces) vegetables (see Note)
  • 5 ounces baby spinach or another green you like, roughly chopped
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • Red pepper flakes
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 6-ounce can tomato paste
  • 1 (28-ounce) can crushed tomatoes
  • Handful chopped fresh basil (optional)
  • Assembly
  • 1 pound dried lasagna noodles (not no-boil type)
  • 1 pound (2 cups) whole milk ricotta
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream (optional)
  • 1 pound coarsely shredded low-moisture mozzarella
  • 1 cup (4 ounces) finely grated parmesan

Make your vegetable mixture: In a large frying pan, heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil over medium-high heat. The order you add your vegetables in has to do with what you’re using, but you’ll of course want to add the ones that take the longest to soften first. I cooked my onion and fennel together for 8 to 10 minutes, until lightly browned at the edges, then added the mushrooms and cooked them for 5 minutes, until they’d softened and any liquid that was released had mostly cooked off. I added the spinach in the last minute, just letting it soften. Season each addition with salt and pepper for the best fully-developed flavor. Once vegetables are all tender and well-seasoned, scrape them into a bowl.

Make the sauce: In the same pan, heat remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil. Add garlic, a couple pinches of red pepper flakes and up to a full teaspoon if you want it spicy, and oregano and cook together for 30 seconds to 1 minute, until the garlic is just barely golden. Add tomato paste (save the can) and cook for 3 to 4 minutes, don’t worry if it seems to be drying out. Add tomato paste cans of water (1 1/4 cups) and stir up any stuck bits, cooking until smooth. Add canned tomatoes, 1 teaspoon salt and basil, if you’re using it. Simmer mixture together for 4 to 5 minutes; adjust seasonings to taste. You’ll have 4 cups of sauce.

Assemble lasagna: Heat oven to 400 degrees F. Place lasagna noodles in a large bowl or baking dish and cover with the hottest tap water you can get. Soak for 10 minutes. Mix mozzarella and parmesan. Mix ricotta with heavy cream, if you want to keep it as creamy as possible (skip cream if this doesn’t bother you) and season the ricotta with some salt and black pepper.

Coat a 9×13 baking dish at least 2.5 inches deep and ideally 3 inches deep lightly with oil or nonstick spray. Pour 1/3 sauce and spread it evenly. Shake water off noodles and arrange your first layer of noodles, slightly overlapping their edges.

Dollop 1/4 of the ricotta (about 1/2 cup) over noodles and spread it in an even layer with a spoon or spatula. Add 1/4 of vegetable mixture, then about 1/5 of mozzarella-parmesan mixture (just eyeball it). Pour a scant cup (more than 3/4 cup, less than 1 cup) of sauce evenly over cheese. Place next layer of noodles on top. Repeat this process (1/4 of ricotta, 1/4 of the vegetables, 1/5 of the mozzarella-parmesan, scant 1 cup of sauce) three times, using up all but the mozzarella-parmesan mixture and about 1/3 cup of the sauce.

Place final layer of noodles on top, spread the remaining sauce thinly over it and scatter the top with the remaining mozzarella-parmesan mixture.

Bake lasagna: Cover a large tray with foil (for easy cleanup) and place baking dish on top of it. Lightly coat a piece of foil with nonstick spray and tightly cover baking dish with foil, oil side down. Bake with the foil on for 30 minutes, or the pasta is tender — a knife should easily go through. Remove foil (carefully, so carefully) and bake for another 20 minutes, until lasagna is golden on top and bubbling like crazy. Keep it in the oven another 5 minutes for a darker color.

Wait, then serve: The best lasagna has time to settle before you eat it. When it comes out of the oven, it might seem like it’s a sloshy mess, but 45 minutes later (mine is always still very hot, but you might need less time in a cold kitchen) it will be glorious — the excess water absorbed into the noodles and filling, and ready for a relatively clean slice.

Serve in big squares.

Do ahead: Leftovers should stay in the pan. I like to reheat lasagna with the foil off because I like it when the top gets very dark.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

New here? You might want to check out the comment guidelines before chiming in.

83 comments on perfect vegetable lasagna

  1. Mimi

    If you don’t care for ricotta in baked pasta dishes, maybe try cottage cheese instead. I used cottage years ago when I was out of ricotta and haven’t looked back since. I use full fat, small curd cottage cheese, a pound per 9×13 pan, and it bakes down into this melty, velvety deliciousness. Anyone who tries my lasagnas (heavy on the veggies, like this one) is converted.

  2. Alexandra

    Oh, I love this ricotta + heavy cream idea for when you don’t want to make a bechamel! My go-to move for this is to mix marscapone with pesto, but I like this for when I don’t want pesto-y flavors in there.

    1. Elizabeth A VanDuyne

      Just FYI, the Instagram link was not working for me…took me to sports highlights for some reason? But the lasagna looks amazing and I can’t wait to clear out enough time to try it!

  3. Susan

    Thank you for also not committing the cardinal sin of vegetarian lasagnas, REPLACING THE PASTA WITH ZUCCHINI. “PASTA IS VEGETARIAN” I [the very-picky-about-vegetables vegetarian] scream at my computer a few times a year.

  4. This looks delicious. I always put lasagna in loaf pans, making a deeper dish lasagna, and this way, I can make a whole recipe, divide into three loaf pans, and it is a perfect serving for two, with leftovers. The other 2 loaf pans are put in the freezer for quick dinners at another time.

    1. Angela

      I came to say this. Loaf pan lasagna is the best. We have an extra long skinny pan that is exactly one noodle wide (by 1.5 long, I think) and it is perfect.

    2. WOW! I LOVE the loaf pan idea! Even to bake several at a time… (and not to freeze). Think of all those layers and extra crispy edges! Thank you! You’re my hero! :)

    3. Susan

      This is genius! As a family of 2 empty nesters, I am still trying to figure out how to cook the food we liked as a family of 4, without having to eat leftovers many days in a row!

  5. swarmofbeasts

    Oh my god, this is the vegetable lasagna I’ve been waiting over ten years for. (I’d say my whole life, but I was happy with meat lasagna until I stopped eating meat!) I can’t wait to make this.

  6. Gail

    Deb, just when I thought I couldn’t possibly love you more, you perfectly described my feelings about lasagna AND food fussiness. It’s not that I don’t like some foods, I just don’t like it when they’re poorly treated. I had exactly the same thing happen to my veggie lasagna a couple of weeks ago and waited until it cooled down for the kids and oh my goodness it was perfect and now I want more lasagna!

  7. Leah

    Have 700 other people already commented about using hot tap water? Please do not use hot tap water in your cooking. Especially if you live in an old building.

      1. Marcie

        Sadly it isn’t the source of the water, it is the pipes in your house or building. Many communities have replaced their water pipes but from the street in to your home haven’t been replaced. San Francisco is the same way – excellent tap water but old pipes in homes still mean lead is a problem. And there is no safe level of lead exposure. Even in 2020, plumbing fixtures can still contain lead.

        1. Gail

          I’ve read this too, and sadly no longer use hot tap water (to speed up pasta cooking time, etc, or to drink). I read the book Never Home Alone by Rob Dunn recently, and though he is generally happy with the idea of us sharing our home with lots of invisible microbes (they’re good for us mostly, and do important work in our homes!), hot water in pipes is one thing he does say we need to be careful about. Even hot water coming out of old shower heads! I am not a germophobe and generally pretty lax about cleanliness and my house/children and the latest freakout of the day about Things that Might Harm our Family!, but Dunn convinced me about this one. (It’s a fun read, too!) https://www.amazon.com/Never-Home-Alone-Millipedes-Honeybees/dp/1541645766

    1. Kate

      But if ” boiling water does not remove lead but can actually increase its concentration,” as the article says, what should we realistically do if we need hot water for cooking?

      Being in Milwaukee, I’m concerned about this as well. We are fortunate enough to be homeowners and installed a whole house filter. But ultimately my take would be . . . yes, use filtered water for drinking and definitely baby formula . . . but the amount absorbed by pasta is far less than the whole amount you’re pouring out of the faucet.

      1. Laura

        As a Michigander and physician (cue Flint water crisis reference), I feel pretty well-equipped to chime in as a reliable source on this one. Using cold tapwater that you then heat is different than using hot tapwater. It’s all about how the temperature affects the way the water interacts with contaminants in the pipes. Think back to high school chemistry (or dissolving sugar in water when you make simple syrup); solute dissolves more readily at higher temps. Hot tapwater can “pull” out more contaminants from the pipes’ lining into the water, which is why we recommend against consuming hot tapwater.

        That said, we all know that Deb’s recipe strategies are genius, that she’s extremely smart and well-read, and that her heart is always and forever (and ever! and ever!) in the right place. And, unless you’re regularly consuming hot tapwater, the risk from a single steep here is rather minute. But, there’s also an easy side-step: heat cold tapwater until about 120-125 degrees F (maybe the point at which it starts to steam vigorously?), take the pot off the heat, dump in your noodles for their 10 min soak, and follow all of Deb’s cues from there.

  8. Elaine

    I have everything I need to make this, except I only have the no boil lasagna. I don’t want to go back to the store. But I will if I have to. So, will it be awful if I just proceed with the inferior no-boil noodles? My Valentine loves lasagna.

  9. H

    Saw this on Facebook while I was trying to figure out dinner so it became my project for the night. It is SO GOOD. I made it with 2c mushrooms and 2c eggplant. The ricotta mixed with heavy cream is genius. Only suggestion I was unable to follow was waiting 45 min to dig in.

  10. Susan

    I’ve always wanted to do a vegetable lasagna but I chicken out when my husband side-eyes me; he’s a meat lover. So I’ve always gone halves-ies using meat and vegetables when I make it. It stretches the meat filling that way, too. I chop up frozen broad beans, zucchini, peas, mushrooms and onion to mix in the meat and let it all sort of stew together with a little sauce. I add wilted spinach to the ricotta with parmesan and mozzarella. I’ve always wanted to try it with a béchamel sauce, but I chicken out on that, too because I like a thick layer. I’ll definitely try your ricotta/cream mixture next time. I usually make one meat/veg layer and one cheese layer ..because I’m lazy. I go crazy with sauce in-between and serve some on the side as well. I love it lasagna!

  11. Your comment at the start about the two types of peoples really reminds me of every time someone asks me what food I don’t like. I can definitely say I have eaten lasagnas that I don’t like (Oh you call this mountain of cheap cheese and tomato paste lasagna…), but that doesn’t mean I don’t like lasagna. So I class myself as a picky eater regarding quality, but I don’t think there is a single fruit or vegetable I won’t eat.

  12. Emily

    If you live in Europe then a good substitute for the cheesy part of this is fresh mozzarella cooked in crème fraiche until the mozzarella breaks down and you have a (somewhat) uniform white sauce. I always add a bit of pesto to that as well. Then the rest of the recipe is about the same. I usually add chickpeas for protein and use whatever veggies I have in the fridge.

  13. Carla Cameron

    Hi Deb,

    I love the look of this. I think this would be really really great with a mix of wild mushrooms and the veggies that you mentioned. Instead of a marinara sauce I think I’ll make a sauce from the jarred roasted red pepper I have in the fridge. I’m going to make it for myself for dinner on my birthday.

  14. Truesy

    If you are not using hot tap water, what temperature should it be heated to? I prefer to heat water with an electric tea pot so I don’t waste water running it down the drain waiting for it to get hot enough.

    Thanks so much for the recipe. I have had so many bad lasagna dishes but this looks yummy!

    1. Ellen

      I’d be interested in your recommendation here, too! (I have a kettle with different temperature settings, so I might just set it to the lowest setting, given that hot tap water isn’t that hot…) Unless you think boiling water would be a good idea?

  15. Mary

    I cannot wait to make this! We are having a family dinner this week and my daughter-in-law wants to have an Italian dinner. I’d like to make this ahead of time and freeze it. Can it be frozen before baking, or should I bake it and then freeze it?
    Thank you!

  16. I find that I’m a lasagna snob…lol. I haven’t boiled lasagna noodles in years, and I find it’s a waste of time. I know that results in having to cook things longer, but I don’t mind – it’s always worth the wait. I cover with foil for 55 minutes and then take the foil off and let it really golden up for 10 or 15 min more. I always use a baking sheet underneath, as yes, it does tend to boil over. I do more layers than it calls for. We use whole wheat noodles, and layer in between. i.e. – a layer for sauce, noodles, layer for cheese, noodles, etc. Ending with sauce and cheese on top – usually 2 1/2 boxes for 2 pans. I also use a combination of cottage and ricotta, probably for the dryness issue, but also for cost. I always cook two pans because we had 7 kids. One pan was never enough. Now we all want leftovers for lunch, lol. Needless to say, they are heavy pans! We have tried veggie lasagna several times, and haven’t quite got the sauce right (we like the white sauce with veggies), we like more of a garlicky Alfredo taste. Anyway – this is wordier than I meant. Thanks for sharing your great recipes!!

    1. deb

      You linked to a lasagna with a bechamel, wine, no-boil noodles, and no tomato sauce. I mean, maybe it’s good but I wouldn’t call them similar. (Please note that I always credit sources and inspiration on SK and always have.)

  17. Lucy Lehman

    Deb,
    Here’s how to make lasagna noodles not stick together after boiling: Drain, put back in pot. Fill pot with cold water, drain again, and repeat rinse once more.
    Then, when you drain them, leave the noodles in the colander and place the colander over your cooking pot to catch any drips. The noodles will not stick together, and are easy to work with. (You’ve removed the starch, which acts like glue.) Then every recipe is easy.

  18. Katie

    I have deep loyalty to your previously posted lasagna’s (especially the bolognese one, which is insanely amazing). One of the reasons I love them so much is that I feel like I also am constantly disappointed by ricotta, though I’ve never had it fresh before, so maybe that’s why? Excited to give this one a try!

  19. Lisa Bruno

    Question: this recipe looks amazing and I love the suggestion of making two and freezing. Is the previously-frozen lasagna watery when it defrosts? At what step do you freeze it – before or after cooking? Thank you! Can’t wait to try this.

    1. deb

      You can freeze it before or after. I usually recommend on pasta bakes freezing it before, but since these noodles are uncooked (vs. pasta bakes with already cooked noodles), it might be a little awkward and the noodles might break. It shouldn’t be watery. Or, it might seem it while baking (as this one does too) but it should absorb back in as it rests before you cut it.

  20. Ellen

    I usually beat an egg (or sometimes two) into my ricotta, which also works to make it creamier. I don’t usually buy heavy cream, so this works well for me.

  21. Sandy G

    Years ago Cooks Illustrated had a lasagna recipe that soaked no boil noodles in hot water before baking. I think they taste the closest to homemade. But I see that Deb doesn’t agree and now I’m thinking I should soak regular noodles. I also make Deb’s homemade ricotta and thin with milk or cream. Going to try this recipe!

  22. LitProf

    Thank you for making our Valentine’s Day dinner so wonderful! Followed the recipe exactly and 4 adults and 3 kids devoured it! Deb, you’re invited to every party I throw.

  23. ageice

    “…and wondering why you didn’t just make baked ziti, which would never do you like this” had me giggling over my coffee this morning. You’re one of only two recipe mavens whose accompanying stories I make a point to read along with the recipe (Joy the Baker is the other). Thank you for keeping it real always!

  24. Lisa

    Deb!! You hit the nail on the head with all my lasagna quibbles! And I currently have a fridge full of shrooms, fennel & spinach! Totally making this! However,I have one comment to add to this perfection—have you not seen the new extra deep Pyrex dishes?! They are beyond brilliant & precisely what you need to overcome scrubbing your oven floor! If I could, I would send you a set! They were on sale at Costco recently. They are worth seeking out! Ask your sweetheart to get you a set for Valentine’s Day!😉😁

  25. Kim

    Looks so yummy! Love the freedom to add whatever veggies are on hand!! I am definitely going to try this!!
    Re: pre- cooking noodles-
    I have always made my lasagna with regular whole wheat noodles and have never pre-cooked them. Or pre-soaked them.
    I typically let the assembled dish sit awhile in the fridge before cooking, and often not.
    It always bakes up perfectly.

  26. Sarah

    This looks so great!! As a vegetarian, I’ve been trying to be better about having more protein in my main dishes so I’m not hungry 2 hours later. Any suggestions on what you think would work best here? I was thinking maybe black beans or white beans (I feel like tofu wouldn’t go). Thanks!

  27. Kathy D

    I only read lasagna recipes as a voyeur, because my Italian grandmother taught me how to make lasagna, and that is how I’m always going to make it. But I have made a few adjustments over the years. If you live in an area where you can easily buy fresh pasta sheets, those work well. I hate boiling lasagna noodles, and I don’t care about the ruffles. The fresh sheets just go right in. If you do use fresh pasta sheets, though, run a knife through in a few spots so that steam can escape. I also always put an egg or two in the ricotta, to help it hold together, along with some garlic, oregano, basil, salt and pepper. (I don’t change much else – my grandmother would not approve!)

  28. Marion

    I just have to make sure that you all have seen Paris Hilton cooking lasagna in her new video. Well worth the watch–it’s on YouTube.

    Deb, you should really do your own video–don’t forget the dog, the driving gloves, and your hair all over the place ;)

    I will be making this next weekend–thanks for the tip on soaking the noodles!

  29. Anna

    This was great! I used onions, zuchinni, and spinach. This was my first time making lasagna, and it turned out great! Waiting for 45 minutes really helps it solidify and come together.

    1. Having done 1/3 of the total amount, due to the ambiguity you mention and my own follow-up failure to do math on the repeated layers, I can confirm that it’s 1/3 cup of sauce in the bottom on the pan. I think mine will still taste fine, but with more sauce in the bottom it’s extra soupy and I had to skimp on sauce in the layers.

  30. Kara

    Soaking the noodles really works! This made making it much less of a hassle. I loved it and will use this method for all lasagnas now.

  31. erineaguayo

    I registered for a lasagne pan when I was engaged 13 years ago, and ended up buying it myself when no one else sent it to my eagerly outstretched arms. It’s a straight-sided, three-inch high marvel of engineering and product design. It’s come in handy many times, but now I know it was waiting for this recipe. I can’t wait to unite them.

  32. lax2cdg

    I just can’t stop staring at that perfectly set up square of deliciousness. Must. Make. This.

    Also, I like to say that I am not a picky eater. But I am. And you captured the kind I am! “[T]he kind that finds their epicurean limitations to constrict like an uncomfortable jacket they’d love to shed if they could figure out how.”

    Sigh.

    1. 2b

      You’re right that the instructions omitted words as to the number of cans of water, but it specifies 1.25 cups. When Deb answered an earlier question about this, she said two cans of water. That would be 1.5 cups (12 ounces from filling a 6-ounce can twice), not 1.25 cups. Then again, I am not sure the 2-ounce difference is going to make or break the sauce or the lasagne.

      When I make it, I’ll split the difference and cut Deb some slack — posting great recipes all the time earns her a few missed words here and there when they don’t affect the end result.

  33. Samantha B

    I once had someone suggest using a mixture of feta and mozzarella with fresh basil, salt, and pepper instead of ricotta in stuffed shells. I liked it so much that I use this mixture instead of ricotta in my lasagna, too.

    I’ll try your recipe, but the second time, I might switch back to feta and mozzarella.

  34. eljahn

    I am so excited for the dry-ricotta fix! We made this last night for our big dinner and it was FANTASTIC! Did zucchini, shrooms, and greens with an onion for the veg. Loved it. Thanks again!

  35. Francesca

    in italy we only use bechamel with lasagne.. you can use oil instead of butter if you want to make it less heavy!!
    I don’t like baked ricotta, too…